Kutná Hora

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Kutná Hora

(ko͝ot`nä hô`rä), Ger. Kuttenberg, city (1991 pop. 24,561), central Czech Republic, in Bohemia. Now an agricultural center, it was an important silver-mining center in the Middle Ages. A national monument, it is a tourist draw and a market for the surrounding farm products. Its famous mint largely created the power and greatness of the medieval kings of Bohemia. In 1421–24, Kutná Hora was captured by the Hussites, recaptured by Emperor Sigismund, and captured again and burned by John Zizka. Until then a stronghold of Catholicism, it became for two centuries the center of Bohemian Protestantism. The city suffered again in the Thirty Years War (1618–48) and lost its importance after the silver mines closed in the 17th cent. Kutná Hora is rich in medieval architecture; the Church of St. Barbara (14th cent.) is a splendid example of Bohemian Gothic, and the Gothic Cathedral of St. James (14th cent.) has a tower 266 ft (81 m) high. The "Italian Court," begun in the 13th cent., is a palace once used both as a mint and as a residence of the kings of Bohemia.

Kutná Hora

 

a city in Czechoslovakia, in the Czech Socialist Republic, Central Bohemia Region. Population, 18,300 (1971). The city has food-processing, textile, and machine-building enterprises.

During the Middle Ages, Kutná Hora was a silver-mining region, and as such it had Europe-wide importance. The sole royal mint was established in Kutná Hora in 1300, in connection with the monetary reform of King Václav II. During the early period of the Hussite revolutionary movement the city became a center of the reactionary, feudal Catholic camp. In January 1422, Hussite troops led by Jan Žižka routed participants in the Second Crusade near Kutná Hora (they were later smashed completely at Německý Brod, present-day Havlvckův Brod) against insurgent Bohemia.

Architectural landmarks in Kutná Hora include Gothic buildings distinguished by the richness of their decor, such as the Cathedrals of St. Barbara (1388–1547; architects P. Parléř, B. Rejt, and M. Rejsek) and St. James (14th century), the Italian Court complex (including the city hall, the royal palace, and the mint; 14th-15th centuries), and the municipal fountain and the Stone House (both dating from the 15th century), as well as baroque buildings, such as the Jesuit College (17th century) and the Churches of St. Bartholomew (17th century) and St. Jan Nepomuk (18th century). Modern housing construction is under way. There is a city museum with collections of decorative and applied art.

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He is the first prize winner of the International Guitar Competitions of Volos, Greece, Kutna Hora, Czech Republic and Tokyo.
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To date, the association's main public platform has been appearances at specialist forums, starting with the international interdisciplinary conference marking the 400th anniversary of the death of Emperor Rudolf II, entitled Rudolfine Kutna Hora, which took place at the Central Bohemia Gallery in Kutna Hora from it to 13 June 2012.
jutting cliff in Kutna Hora, in a restaurant at the lip of the salt
We were thinking of going two hours out to Kutna Hora to see the famous and eery Bone Church, but if one is under time limit like we were, it's best to explore the city instead.
The silver mines made Kutna Hora one of the richest towns in Bohemia," explained Hana as we went down a narrow flight of steps to witness an assortment of life-size figures in white miner's robes illustrating the complex procedures involved from mining silver to the stamping of coins.
Kutna Hora, Czech Republic Kutna Hora draws visitors interested in Czech history.
The extraordinary Kutna Hora, once the capital of the Czech kingdom, is a former silver mining town that built an incredible fortune during the 13th century.
Our second full day in the Czech Republic saw us board a minibus for an excursion to the town of Kutna Hora, which lies an hour or so away.
In it Smahel explores the heritage of the studium in the context of the national tradition, symbols, and vocabulary of the university, the prosopography of the medical faculty, some aspects of the relationship of the school to Hussitism, the controversial developments that led to the royal decree of Kutna Hora (Kuttenberg) in 1409 and the subsequent withdrawal of German students from Prague, and the career of humanists at the university.