Kwangju


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Kwangju,

South Korea: see GwangjuGwangju
or Kwangju
, city (1995 pop. 1,257,504), metropolitan city located in but independent of South Jeolla (Cholla) prov., SW South Korea, in the Yeongsan (Yongsan) River lowland.
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Kwangju

 

a city in South Korea, capital of the South Cholla Province. Population, 403, 700 (1966). Kwangju is a transportation junction and the trade center of an agricultural region (Yonsangan plain). It also has a textile industry.

Kwangju

a city in SW South Korea: an important military base during the Korean War; cotton textile industry. Pop.: 1 448 000 (2005 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Jeonbuk Bank's positive outlook reflects the possibility of a ratings upgrade, which would equalize it with Kwangju Bank's current ratings.
Japan named Yokohama, a port city known for international exchanges, while China chose Quanzhou, an ancient trading port in southern Fujian Province, and South Korea picked Kwangju, a city with more than 2,000 years of history.
See Han for a detailed account of the Kwangju Democratization Movement and its aftermaths in Korean society.
She sought to resist the conformity of her grandfather and father--both "yes-men" to Japanese colonists and then Korean capitalists, respectively--by joining the Kwangju student movement.
In the case of Kwangju demonstrators were searched, clubbed, gassed and even shot at.
After training in neurology at Georgetown University Hospital, he returned to South Korea in 1960 to serve four years as medical director of a health clinic in Kwangju.
backed dictatorial governments (known as the First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Republics of Korea) continued to severely suppress leftist activity, culminating in the brutal massacre of hundreds of students who partook in the Kwangju Uprising during the 1980s.
He correctly points out that the Kwangju uprising in 1980 was the seminal event that characterized antagonistic civil-military relations in the Republic of Korea, but his scant summary of the unrest leaves an uninformed reader with more questions than answers.
Finally, Steve Choe's essay, "Catastrophe and Finitude in Lee Chang Dong's Peppermint Candy: Temporality, Narrative, and Korean History" explains how Lee's now-canonical study of the downfall of a kind of Korean everyman functions as a kind of allegory, providing the means for spectators to consider how elements of Korea's traumatic past (most notably the Kwangju massacre) have been repressed, willfully forgotten, and overshadowed by a focus on the here and now of economic development.
The most egregious incident occurred in 1980, after hundreds of Koreans were killed during an uprising against Chun's military rule in the southwestern city of Kwangju.
The Korean Government established six additional new bank account tracking teams in 2004 to serve out of the District Prosecutor's offices in the metropolitan cities of Busan, Daegu, Kwangju, Incheon, Daejon, and Ulsan, to expand its reach.