Laconian


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Laconian

inhabitant of ancient country of Laconia; people noted for pauciloquy. [Gr. Hist.: NCE, 1514]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Spartans own most of the Laconian land while the helots own none.
Those Laconians who were neither helots nor Spartans lived in communities of "dwellers around," bound to Sparta by treaties so that they could organize no action on their own.
as a victor in the rich fields of Pylades, the host of Laconian Orestes, whom, indeed, at the slaughter of his father.
117) That the more important of the two slaves in the early part of Knights is meant (at least intermittently) to represent Demosthenes is proved by 54-7 where this slave claims to have `kneaded a Laconian barley-cake at Pylos' which Paphlagon-Kleon stole and served up to the Demos as if he had made it.
There would appear to be at least one Laconian reference here.
The brusque and clipped language of both the Epops and his Servant recalls Plutarch's characterization of Laconian speech: `although the speech of the Spartans seems short, yet it certainly reaches the point, and arrests the thought of the listener'.
When the Chorus of Birds finally assemble, their first cries are full of Laconian `repetition for the sake of emphasis'--in the modern sense of the word:(82) [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; (for [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [`where']) (310), and [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (for [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [`what']) (315).
The Messenian helots probably worked principally as agricultural laborers, while their Laconian counterparts, dwelling in closer proximity to their masters, could serve in other, more direct fashions, such as personal servants or as military support.
They could claim the right to asylum, at least at the Sanctuary of Poseidon at Laconian Tainaron, and, under Spartan rule, they maintained certain cults and ritual observances.
when Messenians rose up, taking advantage of a devastating Laconian earthquake, and defiantly took refuge on Mount Ithome.
The focus will be on the preface to book three of the Periegesis, the Laconian History (3.
Given the probability that Alcman drew repeatedly on Laconian legend, as Pindar turned with regularity to local Theban stories, he is likely to have turned more than once to stories of the Hippocoontidae.