Murasaki Shikibu

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Related to Lady Murasaki: The Tale of Genji

Murasaki Shikibu

(mo͞o'räsä`kē shē'kēbo͞o`), c.978–1031?, Japanese novelist, court figure at the height of the Heian period (794–1185). Known also as Lady Murasaki, she is celebrated as the author of the romantic novel Genji-Monogatari [tale of Genji], one of the first great works of fiction to be written in Japanese and often considered the world's first novel. Written in long, flowing, lyrical sentences, it concerns the life and loves of Prince Genji and his descendants and is a subtle and thorough delineation of a complex society.

Bibliography

See her diary translated by R. Bowring (1982); classic translation of Genji by Arthur Waley (1925, repr. 2000); modern translations by E. G. Seidensticker (1976), R. Tyler (2001), and D. Washburn (2015).

Murasaki Shikibu

11th-century Japanese court lady, author of The Tale of Genji, perhaps the world's first novel
References in periodicals archive ?
Although al-Sabi' is not a novelist and, like Lady Murasaki, he didn't create dramatis personal, nevertheless the Buyid official is definitely a representative voice of his society filtered through his administrative fiction.
At last he arrives in rural France, where his uncle's Japanese widow, Lady Murasaki (Gong Li), takes him in.
The 11th-century Japanese tale of Genji and Lady Murasaki
There are women in the inventories--Sappho, Hypatia, Lady Murasaki, Jane Austen, Madame Curie, and others--but Dead White Males, as Murray likes to call them, do most of the heavy lifting in his specified fields of intellectual accomplishment.
For example, in the eleventh-century novel The Tale of Genji, Lady Murasaki wrote a story in which her simplest descriptions of the garden and the wind convey the atmosphere of love.
An operatic version of the classic 1,000-year-old Japanese court novel ''The Tale of Genji'' written by Lady Murasaki Shikibu will open in Tokyo next week staged by an American artistic director and a Japanese composer.
The designs inside the fans are hand-painted images representing scenes from a famous Japanese book entitled The Tale of Genji by Lady Murasaki.
Lady Murasaki, author of the steamy novel Tale of Genji, had her salary at the Kyoto imperial court paid in salmon.
Lady Murasaki Shikibu was the daughter of a famous provincial governor and the widow of a lieutenant in the Imperial Guard.
Considered as the world's first novel, The Tale of Genji, written by Lady Murasaki Shikibu, is a chronicle of court life on love, glory and decline of the handsome main character Hikaru Genji.
Tadeusz Konwicki, A Dreambook for Our Time Lady Murasaki, The Tale of Genji Cormac McCarthy, All the Pretty Horses Lautreamont, Maldoror Vasily Grossman, Life and Fate Tolstoy, War and Peace Yasunari Kawabata, Snow Country Hemingway, Islands in the Stream The Poetic Edda The tales of Chekhov The tales of Hawthorne Njal's Saga Sigrid Unset, Kristin Lavransdatter Melville, The Piazza Tales London, Martin Eden Julio Cortazar, Hopscotch The poems of Emily Dickinson Faulkner, Pylon and The Sound and the Fury Homer, the Odyssey and the Iliad Nikos Kazantzakis, The Odyssey: A Modern Sequel Heidegger, Being and Time Poe, The Narrative of A.
The Tale of Genji by the celebrated court lady Murasaki Shikibu is regarded as the single greatest piece of Japanese literature; it has continued to influence the writers of Japan, even to the present time.