Lamia

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Lamía

(lämē`ä, lā`mēə), city (1991 pop. 44,084), capital of Fthiótis prefecture, E central Greece. It is a transportation hub and an agricultural center. Founded about the 5th cent. B.C., it was the chief city of the small region of Malis and developed as an ally of Athens. It gave its name to the Lamian War (323–322 B.C.), waged by the confederate Greeks against Antipater, the Macedonian general, who took refuge in the city and was besieged there for several months. Antipater conquered (322 B.C.) the confederates at Crannon, near Larissa. Lamía was known as Zituni from the 10th to the 19th cent.

Lamia

(lā`mēə), in Greek mythology, grief-crazed woman whose name was used to frighten children. Her own children were killed by Hera, who was jealous of Zeus' love for her; thereafter Lamia, out of envy for happy mothers, stole and killed the children of others. In later legend, the name Lamia was also used for a woman who lured a youth to his destruction.

Lamia

 

a city in central Greece, near the Gulf of Maliakos in the Aegean Sea, administrative center of the nome (department) of Phthiotis. Population, 37,800 (1971). The major activities are tobacco and cotton processing and the production of rugs. Lamia was founded in the fifth century B.C.

Lamia

female spirit in serpent form; devours children. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 146; Br. Lit.: “Lamia” in Benét, 563]

Lamia

scaly, four-legged, hermaphrodite creature. [Br. Folklore: Briggs, 260–262]