Lamian War


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Lamian War

 

a war of the Greek city-states in 323–22 B.C. against the Macedonian hegemony.

The Lamian War was begun by Athens at the urging of democratic strata of the population, after learning of the death of Alexander of Macedonia. Athens was joined by Phocis, Aetolia, and other city-states. The anti-Macedonian camp was headed by Demosthenes, who had returned from exile, and by Hypereides. The victory of united Greek troops under the command of Leos-thenes forced Antipater, the Macedonian general, to find shelter for his army in the city of Lamia. However, conflicts within the anti-Macedonian forces, discontent with the war in the oligarchical circles supporting Macedonia, and the help being given to Antipater led to the collapse and defeat of the coalition. A Macedonian garrison was installed in Athens.

References in periodicals archive ?
Beginning with a chapter on the arms and armies of the successors to Alexander to Great and the military culture in the years after Alexander's death, this work goes on to discuss major battles of the era, from the Lamian War (323-322 BC) to Ipsus (301 BC), focusing on issues of tactics and strategy.
Whether you want to know about the Forum Romanum or the Lamian War or the position of women or almost anything else, there's a lot to be said for beginning a quest for information here.
Once again the result was failure as the Athenians lost the Lamian War, and Demosthenes committed suicide.
Nicanor was outmatched by the experience and expertise of Polyperchon's general, Cleitus the White, naval victor in the Lamian War.
There were two kings before and after Triparadeisus; and an Athenian statesman who proposed honours for the Macedonian court in the delicate years after the Lamian War would be well advised to recognise the fact.
Diodorus' coverage of events in the Perdiccan camp in 322 is sparse, overshadowed by the Lamian War, and there is no direct record of the proclamation.