Land League


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Related to Land League: Irish National Land League

Land League:

see Irish Land QuestionIrish Land Question,
name given in the 19th cent. to the problem of land ownership and agrarian distress in Ireland under British rule. The long-term result of conquest, confiscation, and colonization was the creation of a class of English and Scottish landlords and of an
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References in periodicals archive ?
Land League was always on the back foot after suffering interference at the first two fences and stuck to his task well, shaping as though he is capable of better.
Gwaith y Land League oedd trefnu protestiadau bob tro y cai ty ei ad-feddiannu.
Terence Powderly combined membership in the Knights of Labor with membership in the Land League.
The Irish Land League and subsequent agrarian movements were genuinely transnational phenomena in that they connected Ireland with the diaspora worldwide.
Crop failures in Ireland, the renewed threat of famine, the agitation of the Land League, and the rise of the home rule movement under Charles Stewart Parnell, captured public attention in the United States during the last decades of the century, Sim argues, but did not stir government policy or halt the growing accord between Britain and the United States.
The Land League in the US sent both financial and political support back to Ireland, and the stateside organization fought for self-determination rather than full Irish control, setting a precedent for future groups.
Anthony Clarke was a radical, a key figure in the Irish National Land League of tenants fighting for rent reductions.
Her family tree took her back to County Mayo, Western Ireland, where her great-grandfather Anthony Clarke was one of the very rst members of the Land League, an organisation formed in 1879 which campaigned for impoverished tenant fathers to have the right own their land.
Anthony Clarke became secretary of the local branch of e Irish National Land League, small tenants tak-tak ing on the system and ghting to prevent evictions and gain rent reductions.
She learns about her roots, which take her back to County Mayo, Western Ireland, where her great-grandfather Anthony Clarke was one of the first members of the Land League, an organisation formed in 1879 which campaigned for impoverished tenant farmers to have the right to own their land.
Beginning with contextual background on the Land War period, the book examines the effects of the agricultural depression of the late 1870s on Kerry farmers, the development of radical responses, Land League agitation in the region, the influence of Fenianism and the rise of agrarian violence, and the influence of rural activism during the Home Rule period.
Wyse-Power was a leading light in the Ladies Land League.