Laodicea


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Laodicea

(lāōd'ĭsē`ə), name of several Greek cities of Asia and Asia Minor built by the Seleucids in the 3d cent. B.C. The most important, Laodicea ad Lycum, was N of Colossae near the present Denizli. On the trade route from the East, the city prospered, particularly under Rome. Extensive Roman ruins include theaters, an aqueduct, a gymnasium, and sarcophagi. Laodicea ad Mare, a seaport of Syria S of Antioch, flourished under the Romans. It is the modern Latakia.

Laodicea

 

the name of several cities founded during the Hellenistic period.

One of the best known was Laodicea ad Mare on the coast of Syria (modern-day Latakia). It was founded by Seleucus I, who ruled from about 312 to 280 B.C, and was a major center for commerce and handicrafts during Hellenistic and Roman times.

Another Laodicea (Laodicea ad Lycum) was situated on the Lycus River in Asia Minor. It is now Eskihisar, a ruined site near the city of Denizli in Turkey. Laodicea ad Lycum was founded by Antiochus II in the middle of the third century B.C. It was a commercial center and a center for wool production. It was plundered by the Seljuks in the 11th century and by the Turks at the end of the 13th century. In 1402 it was destroyed by the troops of Timur. Remains of two theaters, an aqueduct, and a gymnasium survive from ancient times.

Laodicea Combusta was in Lycaonia. It was founded by Seleucus I.

Laodicea ad Libanum, or Scabiosa, was situated on the Orontes River. It was founded by Seleucus I on the site of ancient Kadesh.

Laodicea

the ancient name of several Greek cities in W Asia, notably of Latakia
References in periodicals archive ?
lt;<Saludad a los hermanos de Laodicea, y a Ninfa, y a la Iglesia de su casa>> (Col 4, 15).
Laodicea was perfectly situated at the apex of two trade routes for making money, but the town had no source of water.
She gives a very general overview of the careers of ten figures in the Monophysite party at the time of Justinian: Severus of Antioch, John of Tella, Peter of Reshaina, Thomas of Dara, Thomas of Damascus, Antony of Aleppo, Thomas of Himeria, Constantine of Laodicea, Peter of Apamea, and John Bar Aphthonia.
Among his perspectives are Jews and Christians in the scholarly debate, council texts as a different kind of source material, archaeological and literary evidence for Jews and Christians in Spain before and during the fourth century, the Council of Laodicea, Jewish evidence in Anatolia, the apostolic canons, the text of the Statuta Ecclesiae Antiqua, and latter Gallic councils from 465-541.
ASCII] occurs in the canons of the synod held at Laodicea c.
Dacy also attends carefully to the texts of the early Church councils, beginning with the so-called "Council of Jerusalem" in Acts 15 and stretching through to the Synod of Laodicea in 360 CE, in order to understand how the early Church developed what could be called an institutionalised anti-Judaism.
God threatens to spit Laodicea out of his mouth because "thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked" (Rev.
John's dire warning to the lax church at Laodicea, is the germinal text.
4) Usury was forbidden to clergy but not laity by canon 44 of the 85 Apostolic Canons, canon 17 of the First Ecumenical Council, canon 10 of the Sixth Ecumenical Council, canon 4 of Laodicea, and canon 14 of Basil the Great.
The need to use castrati in church choirs can be traced to the decree of the Council of Laodicea (343-381 A.
The original surveyors detected the city names of Thugga and Laodicea, and the province names of Dalmatia, Judea, Mesopotamia and Syria.