Laodicean


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Laodicean

inhabitant of ancient Greek city, Laodicea; people noted for indifferent attitude toward religion. [Gk. Hist.: NCE, 1529]
References in periodicals archive ?
The novel, "begins very promisingly with a heroine (the Laodicean of the title ) who hesitates between the new industrial world represented by her wealthy and successful father who has left her a fortune, and the old traditional values of the new impoverished aristocracy epitomized by the ancient castle in which she lives" (Mahon, 1976).
Trained by Bailey's wife Caroline, The Laodicean has put himself in the shop window with his consistency, but his owner has been unable to find a buyer.
His is the wealth beyond that for which Babylon, kings of the earth, merchants, and seafarers prostitute themselves but lose in the end (18:24); the riches that the Laodicean church claims to have but does not possess (3:17); the wealth that belongs to the church of Smyrna, though she appears poor (2:9).
Following the introduction and two topical chapters on "Hardy and `The Thinking World'" and "The Question of `Woman,'" Thomas devotes a chapter each to new readings of Desperate Remedies (1891), A Pair of Blue Eyes (1873), The Hand of Ethelberta (1876), A Laodicean (1881), Two on a Tower (1882), and The Well-Beloved (1892; 1897).
As Hardy's A Laodicean shows, his fiction can also treat photography more materialistically, as a medium of trickery and deception.
8 Elwyn ("Inviolability" 180) suggests that the conflict of the Laodicean War may have blocked the Aetolian invitation to Smyrna in 246/5.
Moretti, 'Epigraphica', RivFil 93 (1965), 284-7, who explains the Laodicean honours for Hagemonidas (set up in his home town at Dyme) by the hypothesis that he had saved Laodicea from punishment by Demetrius after the murder there of the Roman legate Cn.
101) Scott detected this kind of Laodicean lukewarmness in official reluctance to implement the recusancy laws, in the crypto-popery creeping into "the heart and bosome" of the Stuart court and state, in the pro-Catholic character of domestic religious policy -- not to mention long-term dynastic plans.
A wide range of other topics, texts, and critical approaches is addressed by, for example, Mary Jacobus's study of Hardy's literary posthumousness, Wayne Anderson's discussion of his 'rhetoric of silence', Avrom Fleishman's commentary on Egdon Heath, Simon Gatrell's analysis of buildings in The Trumpet-Major, A Laodicean, and Two on a Tower, John Bayley's reading of The Woodlanders as social comedy, Elliott Gose's consideration of Tess in relation to Victorian anthropology, and Kathleen Blake's examination of Tess herself both as individual and as abstraction or type.
In the next twenty - four years, he produced eleven novels; Far from the Madding Crowd, The Hand of Ethelberta (1876), The Return of the Native, The Trumpet - Major (1879), A Laodicean (1881), Two on a Tower (1882), The Mayor of Casterbridge, The Woodlanders (1887), Tess of the D ' Urbervilles, Jude the Obscure, and The Well - Beloved (1897).
Too late for doubts, I've backed him and had a saver on The Laodicean, who Andrew Thornton is quite encouraging about.
There is an essay/chapter each on Greenwood Tree, The Return of the Native, The Mayor of Casterbridge, Tess of the d' Urbervilles, and Jude; and interspersed between and around these treatments of the landmark titles are the previously-mentioned "Prelude" (on Hardy 's titles) and chapters treating "Hardy's Dances," the so-called "middle" novels between Return and Mayor (The Trumpet Major, A Laodicean, and Two on a Tower), "Angel Clare's Story" (presented here as a first-person account), and the range of Hardy's references to the wider, extra-Wessex world.