Lapland


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Related to Lapland: Sami people

Lapland

(lăp`lănd'), Finn. Lappi, Nor. Lapland, Swed. Lappland, vast region of N Europe, largely within the Arctic Circle. It includes the Norwegian provinces of Finnmark and Troms and part of Nordland; the Swedish historic province of Lappland; N Finland; and the Kola Peninsula of Russia. Swedish Lappland is now included in Norrbotten and Västerbotten counties.

Lapland is mountainous in N Norway and Sweden, reaching its highest point (6,965 ft/2,123 m) in Kebnekaise (Sweden), and consists largely of tundra in the northeast. There are also extensive forests and many lakes and rivers. The climate is arctic and the vegetation is generally sparse, except in the forested southern zone. Lapland is very rich in mineral resources, particularly in high-grade iron ore at Gällivare and Kiruna (Sweden), in copper at Sulitjelma (Norway), and in nickel and apatite in Russia. Kirkenes and Narvik (both in Norway) are the chief maritime outlets for Scandinavian Lapland, and Murmansk is the port for Russian Lapland. The region abounds in sea and river fisheries and in aquatic and land fowl. Reindeer are essential to the economy; there is a growing tourist industry in the region.

The Sami, formerly known as Lapps or Laplanders, who constitute the indigenous population, number from about 80,000 to 100,000. The largest concentration of Sami are found in Norway (about 50,000), where formerly they were called Finns (hence the province name Finnmark). Sami institutions in Norway include a parliament (est. 1989) in Karasjok, which advises the federal parliament on Sami concerns, and the anthropological Nordic Sami Institute in Kautokeino. There are also Sami parliaments in Sweden and Finland, and the international Sami Council works to protect the rights of Sami throughout Lapland. The Sami speak a Finno-Ugric language, also called Sami and divided into three broad regional dialects, but only about 30,000 are Sami speakers. The Sami once led a largely nomadic life, but now only about a tenth raise and follow the reindeer herds, wintering in the lowlands and summering in the western mountains. Their movements today are more restricted than in former times. Other Sami are sea and river fishermen and hunters or work in other fields.

Little is known of their early history, and they have proved to have no genetic resemblance to any other peoples. It is believed that they came from central Asia and were pushed to the northern extremity of Europe by the migrations of the Finns, Goths, and Slavs. They may have assumed their Finnic language in the last millennium B.C. Though mainly conquered by Sweden and Norway in the Middle Ages, the Sami long resisted Christianization, which was completed only in the 18th cent. by Russian and Scandinavian missionaries, and elements of their traditional shamanism survived despite being banned.

Bibliography

See V. Stalder, Lapland (1971) and N.-A. Valkeapaa, Greetings from Lappland: The Sami—Europe's Forgotten People (1983).

Lapland

 

a region in northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland and the western part of Murmansk Oblast, USSR, north of 64°-66° N lat. It is the basic area of settlement of the Saam or Lapps.

Lapland

northern region of Scandinavian peninsula, mostly within Arctic Circle. [Geography: Misc.]

Lapland

an extensive region of N Europe, mainly within the Arctic Circle: consists of the N parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and the Kola Peninsula of the extreme NW of Russia
References in periodicals archive ?
In a few years, the number of visitors heading for Lapland at Christmas has topped 100,000, with Finns, Russian and Norwegians swelling the hordes from Britain.
Lapland tourism chiefs last month released a statement giving Santa a clean bill of health for the coming festive season.
While the Japanese, Germans and Finns themselves love visiting Lapland - an area that covers part of Sweden and Finland - it's mainly the British who are buying there, according to Colin Brunt, of property company Above the Arctic.
Nowturn to the next page to find outwhy these three little starswere picked to meet Santa in Lapland .
After landing in Lapland, the winners will be taken by reindeer-pulled sled to Santa's secret hideaway, where they will meet the big man in red before returning to Glasgow later that night.
The 41-year-old civil servant was thrilled when we rang her to tell her she had won a fabulous visit to see Santa in Lapland.
There are many other activities on offer in Lapland, including snow-shoeing, reindeer sleigh rides, husky dog-sledding and snow-mobiling.
Part 2 applies to residents of Lapland Lake participating in secondary education severely disabled students and their supply transport in Loviisa, agreed in contract negotiations place and getting the same place Loviisa home to Lapland Lake in the afternoon, or if the student LapinjEnrvi resident of study other than the students in Loviisa residents to study municipal, transportation may involve the transport of pupils in Lapland Lake studying the resort.
The Sully teenager had her special Christmas wish granted last week when she was transported with her parents to Lapland by Make-A-Wish UK, the charity that grants magical wishes to children and young people fighting life-threatening conditions.
Three Claim Reservations granted in the Lapland region of Finland
ST), an independent storage integrator in Europe, announced today that it will provide Lapland Hospital District with a VNX5400 storage system to meet its increased demand for storage capacity.
LITTLE Alfie Sharpe enjoyed the trip of a lifetime to Lapland, where when he met Santa, his reindeer and huskies.