Chattian

(redirected from Late Oligocene)

Chattian

[′chad·ē·ən]
(geology)
Upper Oligocene geologic time. Also known as Casselian.
References in periodicals archive ?
The team found the animal's skull, teeth, and humerus (upper arm bone) and dated it between the late Oligocene to early Miocene era.
Time interval: Late Eocene (Priabonian) and late Oligocene (Chattian).
The members of Promalacoclemmys Reinach, 1900, a genus known in the late Oligocene of Switzerland and the early Miocene of Germany, differ from the Boutersem taxon in several characters, among others: very wide vertebrals in relation to the pleurals, the width from the second to the fourth vertebrals considerably decreasing; first vertebral noticeably wider than the nuchal plate, having a long contact with the posterior margin of the second pair of marginals; relatively long visceral development of the cervical scute; well-developed gular protrusions (Hervet, 2004a).
A renewed transgression in the Late Oligocene and Early Miocene across the northern region left behind some pelagics and limestones.
Boni-01 is designed to test the hydrocarbon potential of early to late Oligocene fluvial sandstone reservoirs in stacked stratigraphic traps against a prominent basement high.
Among the topics are the character and significance of flood deposits in continental and marine environments, a case study of genetic indices in hyperpycnal systems in the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene merecure formation in Venezuela's Maturin Sub-basin, fluvial-derived turbidites in the Los Molles formation, ichnologic signatures of hyperpycnal flow deposits in Cretaceous river-dominated deltas in the Austral Basin of southern Argentina, and evidence of shelfal hyperpycnal deposition of Pliocene sandstones in the Oilbird Field on the southeast coast of Trinidad.
The late Oligocene is among the least sampled intervals in primate evolutionary history, and the Rukwa field area provides a first glimpse of the animals that were alive at that time from Africa south of the equator," said Nancy Stevens, an associate professor of paleontology in Ohio University's Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine who leads the paleontological team.
The last, neotectonic stage includes Late Oligocene through recent tectonic movements.
However, it pales in comparison to Stag, which dates back 35 million years when the first deer appeared during the late Oligocene Epoch.
To explain this" - adds the lead author Pier [ETH]auro Ciachino, from Torino, Italy - "we must go back at least to the Late Oligocene (29-24 million years) where a continuum of land connected the Dinarides and Rhodopes mountains, allowing colonization by this phyletic lineage.
ABSTRACT: New Late Oligocene (Chattian) remains of the terrapins Palaeoemys hessiaca Schleich, 1994 and Palaeomauremys tuberculata (Portis, 1882), the soft-shelled turtles Allaeochelys parayrei Noulet, 1867 and Trionyx cf.