latent defect


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latent defect

[′lāt·ənt ′dē‚fekt]
(industrial engineering)
A flaw or other imperfection in any article which is discovered after delivery; usually, latent defects are inherent weaknesses which normally are not detected by examination or routine tests, but which are present at time of manufacture and are aggravated by use.
References in periodicals archive ?
You state the insurer has denied the claim, citing the exclusion of latent defect.
The problem with addressing latent defect costs using this approach is timing--the testing occurs much too late in the SDLC to reduce latent defect impacts.
With defective drywall claims, the insurance carriers have uniformly denied paying claims as a latent defect.
We wouldn't know about the latent defects until we analyse the ghost building.
It was accepted that the council could not have been aware of any latent defect beneath the pavement in Northgate, Almondbury, which had remained intact since its construction prior to 1965.
At worst, it results in a product that leaves the factory with a latent defect destined to fail in service.
Mechanical engineers such as me call this the hidden load or the latent load (as in latent defect or hidden defect), and our heads explode when we try to explain this problem to the indoor air crazies who think that only dilution is the solution to indoor pollution.
An excellent example concerning a latent defect is the British Columbia Supreme Court's 1979 decision in Allen et al.
Spills caused by oil tank corrosion, rust, decay, deterioration or latent defect are excluded from coverage, according to a letter to the school district from Massamont Insurance Agency of Shrewsbury.
In Northrop Grumman Corporation, (48) the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals (ASBCA) limited the Navy's recovery on a latent defect theory based on evidentiary issues.
Nonetheless, the potential presence of Vibrio and its serious consequence to some consumers could constitute a latent defect.
Under the majority's opinion and the present state of the law, a subsequent purchaser of a condominium with a latent defect created by a subcontractor and found five years after construction will fall in that category [of the injury without remedy] if the contractor has gone bankrupt or out of business.