latent defect


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latent defect

[′lāt·ənt ′dē‚fekt]
(industrial engineering)
A flaw or other imperfection in any article which is discovered after delivery; usually, latent defects are inherent weaknesses which normally are not detected by examination or routine tests, but which are present at time of manufacture and are aggravated by use.
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem with addressing latent defect costs using this approach is timing--the testing occurs much too late in the SDLC to reduce latent defect impacts.
With defective drywall claims, the insurance carriers have uniformly denied paying claims as a latent defect.
We wouldn't know about the latent defects until we analyse the ghost building.
In finding the defendant vendors liable, the Court ruled that because the vendors knew of the potentially dangerous latent defect, they had a duty to disclose the contamination in the area prior to entering into the sale agreement.
The ASBCA reviewed the expert testimony and found that defects related to improper surface preparation prior to painting were latent defects.
We here consider alleged latent defects, capable of causing serious injury or major property damage, that may only be found years or decades after the developer caused them, yet require repair to avoid later injury or major property loss.
This would usually be where a latent defect is discovered that was not readily apparent on inspection.
Through techniques such as design-for-testability, environmental qualification, integrated test planning, and latent defect screening, we can maintain the exceptional quality needed to delight today's customers.
Any Occurrence Of Skips Or Duplicates In The Delivered Product May Be Considered An Event Of Default And Handled As Provided In The Latent Defect Section Of These Specifications.
Applying too much heat causes component failure or causes flux to evaporate from the solder paste, making the assembly more prone to brittle joints that can create a latent defect in the field.
And in Andreoli v John Henry Homes, Inc, (52) the second district did just that, allowing a case to proceed where the original owner of a once new residence discovered an alleged latent defect within 10 years of purchase, but sued beyond 10 years from purchase.
13) The bricks clearly contained a latent defect which caused water intrusion, but the First District Court of Appeal found that because the subcontractor was required by the specifications to furnish a certain distinctive type of brick, produced by a single manufacturer, it was held harmless from its promise to furnish materials "of good quality.