Lateran


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Lateran

(lăt`ərən), name applied to a group of buildings of SE Rome facing the Piazza San Giovanni. They are on land once belonging to the Laterani; it was presented to the Church by Constantine. The Lateran basilica is the cathedral of Rome, the pope's church, the first-ranking church of the Roman Catholic Church. It is officially named the Basilica of the Savior, familiarly called St. John Lateran, from a monastery of St. John formerly nearby. The basilica, built perhaps before 311, was restored in the 5th and the 10th cent., rebuilt in the 14th and the 15th cent., and altered again in the 16th, the 17th, and the 18th cent.; the main facade was added in 1733–36. Much of the decoration dates from the Middle Ages and includes the mosaics of the apse, which are among the most celebrated. Frescoes by Gentile da Fabriano and Pisanello have disappeared. However, eight 13th-century frescoes in the Sancta Sanctorum chapel (St. Laurence's chapel), painted over and barred to the public in the 16th cent., were restored and opened to the public in 1995. The Lateran baptistery, built probably in the 4th cent., was much restored. The Lateran palace, the papal residence until the 14th cent., survived, greatly changed, until the 16th cent., when it was demolished to make way for the much smaller present palace. It now contains the pontifical museum of Christian antiquities. The older palace was the scene of the five Lateran Councils, and the new one of the signing of the Lateran Treaty.
References in periodicals archive ?
8) Who then was the ideal preacher as envisaged by Lateran IV?
Somewhat later, the Lateran Council of 1215 provided an added impetus for the production of a body of didactic literature to rival that available in Late Old English.
In this context, it is not surprising that the Sancta Sanctorum, a medieval chapel that was once part of the papal palace at the Lateran, would generate great interest at the turn of the twentieth century.
His Beatitude Patriarch Twal holds a doctorate in canon law from the Pontifical Lateran University, and is the first Jordanian to assume this post.
As well as including information on the position of the cycle in relation to other texts and on suggested authorship, the Introduction and copious annotations concern the basic articles of faith and Lateran IV.
With respect to Roman Catholic theologians, von Balthasar's affirmation of the difference between God and creatures, a still greater dissimilarity between God and creatures within such great similarity, following the Fourth Lateran Council [1215], is best interpreted in light of the crucified Jesus as the ground of analogy between God and humanity (80).
But things heated up in the final when players from Pontifical Lateran University claimed an outrageous dive had earned the crucial penalty.
The second half of the Clericus Cup final between the Pontifical Lateran University and Redemptoris Mater College boiled over amid allegations of diving.
This agreement, called the Lateran Treaties, was adopted by Mussolini and never cancelled; it was only revised in 1984.
But at 18, he made the decision to become a priest and, after training, he was ordained at St John Lateran in Rome.
Billy (Professor of the History of Moral Theology and Christian Spirituality at the Alphonsian Academy of Rome's Pontifical Lateran University) and James Keaton (Associate Professor of Moral and Spiritual Theology at the School of Theology at the Pontifical College Josephinum, Columbus, Ohio), The Way Of Mystery: The Eucharist And Moral Living provides the non-specialist general reader with an understanding of the Eucharist and its contribution to the Catholic spirit, ideals, life and community.
The collapse of liberal Italy and the rise of Facist Italy after the war created links between facism and Catholicism that were clearly manifested in the Lateran Pact of 1929.