Laurasia

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Laurasia

(lôrāzh`ə): see continental driftcontinental drift,
geological theory that the relative positions of the continents on the earth's surface have changed considerably through geologic time. Though first proposed by American geologist Frank Bursley Taylor in a lecture in 1908, the first detailed theory of
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.

Laurasia

 

(from “Laurentian Shield,” the former name of the Canadian Shield, and “Asia”), the ancient continent that included the North American, Eastern European, and Siberian platforms, and possibly the Chinese-Korean and South Chinese platforms as well as the Caledonian and Hercynian folded structures located between them. The unification of the North American and Eastern European platforms into a single land mass occurred at the beginning of the Devonian across the area now occupied by the northern part of the Atlantic Ocean. The other parts of Laurasia became joined together by the end of the Paleozoic. The breakup of Laurasia and the formation of the basin of the North Atlantic began in the middle of the Mesozoic.

Laurasia

[lȯ′rā·zhə]
(geology)
A continent theorized to have existed in the Northern Hemisphere; supposedly it broke up to form the present northern continents about the end of the Pennsylvanian period.

Laurasia

one of the two ancient supercontinents produced by the first split of the even larger supercontinent Pangaea about 200 million years ago, comprising what are now North America, Greenland, Europe, and Asia (excluding India)
References in periodicals archive ?
The continental vertebrate faunas from the CampanianMaastrichtian of southwestern Europe show biogeographical affinities with those of the Laurasian landmasses, either from Palaeolaurasia (sensu Russell, 1993, i.
However, the survival rate for Procolophonoidea strongly depends on the number and affinities of Permian procolophonoids, both of which have remained poorly known especially for the Laurasian members of the group.
Nyssa talamancana (Cornaceae): an addition to the remnant Laurasian Tertiary flora of southern Central America.
2009), as well as in the Barremian of Britain (Sweetman, 2009) and in the Aptian or Albian of Asia (Kielan-Jaworowska et al, 1987), indicates that geographical connections between these Laurasian areas could have existed either sporadically or constantly for most of the Early Cretaceous.
Therefore, all current evidence suggests that the tyrannosauroid clade was solely a Laurasian group, restricted to the northern continents.