Guardian

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guardian

1. 
a. Law someone legally appointed to manage the affairs of a person incapable of acting for himself, as a minor or person of unsound mind
b. Social welfare (in England) a local authority, or person accepted by it, named under the Mental Health Act 1983 as having the powers to require a mentally disordered person to live at a specified place, attend for treatment, and be accessible to a doctor or social worker
2. (in England) another word for custos

Guardian

 

an English daily bourgeois newspaper. The Guardian was founded in 1821 in Manchester. (Until 1959 it was called the Manchester Guardian.) Since 1961 it has been published in London and Manchester. The Guardian reflects views similar to those held by the leaders of the Liberal Party. In 1970 its circulation was 290,000 copies.

Guardian

(1) An operating system for Tandem's NonStop computer systems. See Tandem.

(2) An earlier firewall for securing a private network from the Internet from NetGuard, Inc., Fairfax, VA. Guardian ran on Windows NT.
References in periodicals archive ?
A broad reading might include cases where the supreme or surrogate's court appoints counsel to adults under FCA section 262, as long as a law guardian could be appointed in family court under FCA section 249.
Even if we were to ignore the jurisdictional defect in the proceeding, it is undisputed that [the child's] law guardian was not seeking to enforce any of [the child's] alleged constitutional rights," the court said.
Skittone, the lawyer appointed as Francine's law guardian, did not have it in for us, as his favorable report demonstrated.
Developed by Pinnacle Decision Systems, the Case Management System [CMS] assists the Society in its role as law guardian to most of the children who come before Family Court in all five boroughs of New York City.
Catholic poor law guardian George Godfrey Place defended the girls, "saying not one of them is a fallen girl.
He remembers repeatedly telling his caseworker, his law guardian, and even his judge (by letter) that he wanted to go home.
Marc Ruebins, MD, appeared on camera in a Mineola courtroom from his Old Westbury office, and was questioned by attorneys and a law guardian who were in the courtroom.
It was as a Poplar Poor Law guardian that Lansbury won his first elective office: one of a small, but influential, socialist minority among the ranks of doctors, clergy, undertakers and freemasons.