Laxness


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Laxness

Halld?r (Kiljan) (#!hald@$$ur). 1902--98, Icelandic novelist, noted for his treatment of rural working life in Iceland. His works include Salka Valka (1932) and Independent People (1935). Nobel prize for literature 1955
References in periodicals archive ?
But if it is neo-Ottomanism, how can we explain Turkey's laxness with Iran's nuclear program?
Negative connotations led to funk being "associated with the most degrading and dehumanizing racial stereotypes associated with blacks, including sexual profligacy; promiscuity, laxness, lewdness, and looseness" (15).
But Washington's laxness in keeping its word about the conditions for launching a new round of Palestinian-Israeli talks that would end Israel's occupation weakened those who believed in Palestinian-Palestinian reconciliation," Hawash wrote in AN NAHAR.
In addition, more dangerous phenomena resulted from the security laxness.
From October 10, there will be no laxness in its implementation.
The work of Iceland's 1955 Nobel Prize-winning novelist Halldor Laxness has stirred renewed interest since his death in 1998 and is finally being translated for an eager English-speaking public amid fanfare from major contemporary writers.
Judges will always be tempted to hand down sentences in a way designed to "encourage the others" to behave and will also be aware that any laxness on their part will be seized upon by the media and portrayed as an example of famous people escaping justice.
The question demands not only the even-handed treatment of the poets, but also the laxness of allowing 'nomadicity' to trump representative angst.
They were the latest in a stream of Indian government criticism of Pakistan since the Mumbai attacks, reflecting what analysts say is New Delhi's anger over what it regards as Islamabad's laxness in taking strong action against the planners.
Iceland has a rich literature of its own, yet most works remain unknown in the United States; even the works of Halldor Laxness (1902-1998), the recipient of the 1955 Nobel Prize in Literature, have not been widely translated.
The complete disconnection of price movements from underlying real cost changes in modern times is a measure of contemporary monetary authorities' laxness when it comes to preventing inflation, combined with their refusal to acknowledge the theoretical possibility of a benign deflation.
Nevertheless, I would submit that, thanks largely to the laxness of government regulators, greed-driven investment funds have made billions of pounds merely by moving money around the system and producing nothing tangible in return.