Layard


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Layard

Sir Austen Henry. 1817--94, English archaeologist, noted for his excavations at Nimrud and Nineveh
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See also Nickell and Layard (1999), from which our data come.
Layard was given these stories around 1915 by 'Kalsong and Cook', who 'were young men when their people came under the influence of Christianity' (Layard nd:1).
Boone, Peter, Stanislaw Gomulka, and Richard Layard, Emerging From Communism --Lessons From Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, Cambridge, MA and London: The MIT Press, 1998, 244 pp.
According to Layard, the ultimate aim of public policy is to make people happier, and he will be sharing his views on in the 'Recession: health and happiness' event February 26.
Richard Layard and his colleagues examine the impacts of psychological therapy on employment and on the economy.
Most beautiful, however, is the magnificent set of necklace, bracelet and earrings made from genuine ancient Assyrian cylinder seals of carnelian, chalcedony, agate and haematite, in heavy gold settings, given by Layard to his wife as a wedding present and shown here in its original leather case.
Lord Layard, emeritus professor of economics at the London School of Economics, says unskilled immigration is good for employers because it keeps labour costs at building sites and car parks down, but it is bad for the unskilled indigenous population because it depresses their wages and affects job opportunities.
Also, while Shaw deals mostly with the Greco-Roman antiquities of what is now western Turkey, this reviewer noticed errors among the relatively few references to archaeological work further east: thus Smith was not at Carchemish in 1880, nor Layard at Nimrud in 1882.
I start with the sample of twenty OECD countries studied by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell, and Richard Jackman and in my own previous work.
org) which seeks social change based on the work of Professor Lord Layard about the science of happiness.
This is a serious operation set up by a group of academics including a Lord Layard from the London School of Economics and a former head of policy at 10 Downing Street.
A long-term study of postwar unemployment in OECD countries leads Nickell and Layard to conclude that both levels of unemployment and the size of the unemployment response to shocks depend heavily on the unemployment benefit system and the wage-setting mechanisms.