principle of least action

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principle of least action

[′prin·sə·pəl əv ‚lēst ′ak·shən]
(mechanics)
The principle that, for a system whose total mechanical energy is conserved, the trajectory of the system in configuration space is that path which makes the value of the action stationary relative to nearby paths between the same configurations and for which the energy has the same constant value. Also known as least-action principle.
References in periodicals archive ?
It aims to explain ideas rather than achieve technical competence, and to show how Least Action leads into the whole of physics.
Therefore, to account for the flyby anomaly as a nonconserved phenomenon we will use Mauperutuis's rather than Lagrange's principle of least action.
By using saddle point theorem and the least action principle, they obtained system (1.
Recently derivation of CTG equations was made based on the principle of least action [3].
At least action appears to have been taken quickly.
But although Feynman could be lighthearted and amusing when explaining science, he was starkly serious when in its thrall; once enticed by a high-school teacher to study a spinoff of Fermat's Principle called the "principle of least action," he was smitten.
Those which do most to boost energy efficiency, in a league table which will be produced each year, will get a 10% bonus while those which take the least action will pay a 10% penalty.
But Darwinian Evolution, being a natural process, is itself subject to the principle of least action.
Still, at least action had been taken to reduce demand for the loos by making it hellishly difficult to obtain refreshments.
Classical science asserts that the fundamental law of nature is that all things follow the path of least action.
Perry finds in the mad character Trouble-all, whose obsession with the authority of Justice Adam Overdo makes him unwilling to perform the least action without that character's formal warrant, a fitting emblem for Foucauldian man, the remotest reaches of whose life are said to be suffused with and determined by the invisible network of authoritative power.
The Treaties of Maastricht (1993) and of Amsterdam (currently being ratified) provide an unambiguous legal base for foreign policy action -- at least action that corresponds to the European Union's status as a civilian international actor.