Leonids


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Related to Leonids: Perseids, Orionids, Geminids

Leonids

(lee -ŏ-nidz) (November swarm) A periodic meteor shower that tends to be insignificant most years (ZHR about 10) but at 33-year intervals produces a spectacular meteor storm. The shower, radiant: RA 152°, dec +22°, maximizes on the two days around Nov. 17 each year. The associated meteoroid stream is the dust debris from comet Tempel-Tuttle (1866 I) and storms occur when the Earth intersects the stream near the parent comet. This comet has an orbital period of 33 years. The last storm occurred in 1999. Spectacular storms occurred in 1799, 1833, 1866 and also in 1996; 1899 and 1933 were years of only mediocre displays.

Leonids

 

a meteor shower whose radiant is in the constellation Leo. Observed in the middle of November, the Leonids are related to the comet 1866 I, which has a period of 33 years. The dense swarm of meteoric bodies occupies a small part of the comet’s orbit; meteor showers were observed during the comet’s encounters with the earth in 1799, 1833, 1866, and 1966. An insignificant number of meteors have been evident in other years.

Leonids

[′lē·ə·nədz]
(astronomy)
A meteor shower, the radiant of which lies in the constellation Leo; it is visible between November 10 and 15.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leonid Storm "An intense rain of thousands upon thousands of Leonid meteors fell over the western United States for a short interval on the morning of November 17th.
The Leonids are a very minor meteor shower until they outburst, or storm, and that's not projected to happen again until 2033," NASA meteor guru Bill Cooke (http://www.
It noted that the Leonids meteor shower will radiate from constellation Leo and can be observed in the eastern horizon.
The name of this meteor shower - the Leonids - is due to the radiant of the shower being in the constellation of Leo.
The Leonid meteor shower is caused when Earth passes through clouds of debris left behind by the Comet Tempel-Tuttle, which deposits a new trail of dust every 33 years as it orbits the Sun.
Washington, November 16 (ANI): The Leonid meteor showers will peak on November 17 and the best time to view them would be the hours before dawn on November 17 and 18.
BIRMINGHAM stargazers are out in force to watch the famous Leonid meteor shower which is lighting up the night skies - when it isn't full of clouds.
In the mid-1980s, for example, observers who carried out watches on the Leonids were rewarded with rates of up to 10-12 meteors/hr, and even during the quieter years shower activity is laced with a reasonable proportion of bright events.
The Leonids originate from small particles of dust which the comet Tempel-Tuttle 55P leaves in the wake of its passage.
The Leonids, seen every November, are produced by the comet TempelTuttle which measures about 2.
The show will be laid on by Leonids which are meteors or shooting stars caused by dust that fell off a comet called Tempel-Tuttle.