leukotriene

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Related to Leukotriene antagonists: Leukotriene receptor antagonist

leukotriene

[‚lü·kō′trī‚ēn]
(biochemistry)
Any of a family of oxidized metabolites of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids, predominantly arachidonic acid, that mediate responses in allergic reactions and inflammations, produced in specific cells upon stimulation.
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Therefore, leukotriene antagonists could interfere with cytokine function.
Data Source: Two parallel, multicenter "pragmatic" trials to assess the real-world effectiveness of leukotriene antagonists compared with inhaled glucocorticoids as first-line treatment and compared with long-acting beta-agonists as add-on therapy for poorly controlled asthma.
The OTIS study compared perinatal outcomes for 96 women who took a leukotriene antagonist with perinatal outcomes for 122 women with asthma who took only short-acting [beta.
Less evidence supports the use of leukotriene antagonists and inhaled corticosteroids, either individually or in combination (SOR: B).
In a systematic review comparing the use of inhaled glucocorticoids with leukotriene antagonists as monotherapy in the treatment of asthma, Ducharme (2003) concluded that leukotriene antagonists are less effective than inhaled glucocorticoids when used as a single agent in the treatment of asthma.
Data regarding the safety of leukotriene antagonists in pregnancy are extremely limited.
The increasing understanding of leukotriene involvement in inflammation has resulted in the design of new types of anti-inflammatory medications for asthma: leukotriene antagonists.
Omalizumab was evaluated in a pivotal 52-week study of 627 children aged 6-11 years with moderate to severe persistent, inadequately controlled allergic asthma, despite treatment with fluticasone at a dose of 200 mcg or more per day (or the equivalent), with or without other controller medications, which included short-acting beta-agonists (a mean of 2,8 puffs/day) and leukotriene antagonists (37%).
Studies have found that patients never refill 40%-70% of prescriptions for leukotriene antagonists, long-acting [[beta].
d, can cause significant adverse effects, such as profound sedation and urinary retention, and is used only for patients refractory to the more benign leukotriene antagonists and [H.