Leicester

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Leicester

(lĕs`tər), city and unitary authority (1991 pop. 324,394), central England. The city is connected by canals with the Trent River and London, and it is also a railway center. Leicester was of industrial importance as early as the 14th cent.; the making of hosiery, knitwear, and shoes are long-established industries. Other manufactures are chemicals, aniline dyes, textiles, textile and woodworking machinery, and light-metal products. The University College, now the Univ. of Leicester, was founded in 1918 and chartered as a university in 1957. DeMontfort Univ. was established in 1992. Immigration since the 1970s has made Leicester Britain's most ethnically diverse city (in terms of the percentage of nonwhite residents).

Leicester was the Ratae Coritanorum, or Ratae, of the Romans, whose Fosse WayFosse Way
, Roman road in England. It apparently ran from Exeter (Isca Dumnoniorum) NE past Bath (Aquae Sulis), Cirencester (Corinium Dobunnorum), and Leicester (Ratae Coritanorum) to Lincoln (Lindum). It intersected Watling Street.
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 passes nearby. It was also a town of the ancient Britons and was one of the Five Boroughs of the Danes. Its antiquities include the Jewry Wall, a Roman structure 18 ft (5 m) high and 70 ft (21 m) long (near which extensive Roman relics have been found); remains of a Norman castle; and the ruins of an abbey founded in 1143, in which Cardinal Wolsey died in 1530. Several of the churches (St. Nicholas, St. Mary de Castro, and All Saints) show Norman work, and Trinity Hospital is a 14th-century foundation. Leicester Cathedral, originally St. Martin's, dates to Norman times but was largely restored in the late 1800s. Richard III stayed in Leicester the night before he was killed in the battle of Bosworth Field. His body was brought back to Leicester for burial, and his remains, which had been lost, were rediscovered in 2012 and reinterred in 2015 in the cathedral.

Leicester

 

a city in Great Britain, in the eastern Midlands, on the Soar River. It is the administrative center of the county of Leicestershire. Population, 283,500 (1971). Leicester is an important transportation junction. Its manufactures include knitwear and footwear; machines used for these industries are produced in Leicester. The city has chemical industry and enterprises for the production of electrical equipment and tools. Leicester is the site of a university.

Leicester

1
Earl of. title of Robert Dudley. ?1532--88, English courtier; favourite of Elizabeth I. He led an unsuccessful expedition to the Netherlands (1585--87)

Leicester

2
1. a city in central England, in Leicester unitary authority, on the River Soar: administrative centre of Leicestershire: Roman remains and a ruined Norman castle; two universities (1957, 1992); light engineering, hosiery, and footwear industries. Pop.: 283 900 (2003 est.)
2. a unitary authority in central England, in Leicestershire. Pop.: 330 574 (2001). Area: 73 sq. km (28 sq. miles)
3. short for Leicestershire
4. a breed of sheep with long wool, originally from Leicestershire
References in periodicals archive ?
Second row, from left, Liz Healey, Warwick TIC; Andy Woodward, marketing manager for Shakespeare Country, and Jane Markham from Podcats accompanied by two of the Brethren from the Lord Leycester Hospital
Gerald Lesinski, master of the 630-year-old Lord Leycester Hospital in Warwick, said it was less a problem of promotion and more a question of funding.
The master of Lord Leycester Hospital, Lt Col Gerald Lesinski, says the building has running costs of more than PS100,000 per year: "We couldn't exist without the help that The King Henry VIII Endowed Trust and others have given us over the years.
Another great vocalist, Anita Wardell, is also making a very rare visit to the Midlands on Friday, May 12 to take part in a fundraising event for the Campaign to Protect Rural Britain at The Lord Leycester Hospital in Warwick.
Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester, a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I and a relation of Richard Beauchamp, established the Lord Leycester Hospital in 1571 as a home for old soldiers and in 1617 James I was entertained to dinner there.
Members of CSW Broadband - a partnership of eight local authorities led by Warwickshire County Council - announced the new scheme at Warwick's historic Lord Leycester Hospital this morning.
The Lord Leycester Hiospital provides the atmospheric setting for music associated with medieval Spanish pilgrims performed by Concanantes next Tuesday, and music by VillaLobos and Piazzolla features in several programmes, including one from the CBSO's cello section at St Mary's Church on July 2.
The winner gets a reception at Warwick Racecourse for 40 guests, exclusive use of The Lord Leycester Hospital for the ceremony and photo opportunities, professional photography, a wedding car for the day, bridal accessories and accommodation for the bridal party.
Over the years the events promoted by Warwick Arts Society have become part of the traditional fabric of the month's celebrations, kicking off this year on December 9 with a programme of 'Christmas Musicke' performed by the York Waits at the medieval Lord Leycester Hospital.
Among the featured buildings is the Lord Leycester Hospital, which has functioned as a home for retired soldiers since 1571.
In addition to our first prize, 14 runners-up will win a pair of tickets to one of the following gardens: Charlecote Park, Coughton Court, Hidcote Manor Garden, the Shakespeare Houses (Anne Hathaway's Cottage, Hall's Croft, Nash's House/New Place, Mary Arden's House, Shakespeare's Birthplace), Baddesley Clinton, Packwood House, Upton House, Kenilworth Castle, Snowshill Manor, Stratford Butterfly Farm, The Master's Garden at Lord Leycester Hospital, Ragley Hall, Stoneleigh Abbey, Warwick Castle.
TWO authors will talk about their work at the Lord Leycester Hospital in Warwick on Wednesday May 2.