Liberum Veto


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Liberum Veto

 

the right of any member of the Sejm of the Rzeczpospolita (the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania) to annul by his protest the rulings of the Sejm; the requirement for the adoption of the decision was unanimity. The liberum veto was applied for the first time in 1652. In 1764, the Sejm voted to exclude economic questions from the liberum veto. The liberum veto was repealed altogether by the constitution of May 3, 1791.

REFERENCES

Konopczyński W. Liberum veto. Krakow, 1918.
References in periodicals archive ?
While liberum veto allowed one voice of objection to torpedo the whole work of the Sejm, the necessity of unanimity promoted the rule of the so-called "grind of the votes:" insubordinate voices had to be subdued in order to accept the decisions of the majority.
Golden Freedom', their unique political system that spiked any attempts at real political progress and liberum veto, the tycoons' (or their representatives') right to prorogue or disband a Seym (parliament) by a singular veto, were the aristocratic liberties they cherished and most ardently defended.
It reminded him of a similar historical disposition in 18th-century Poland, the liberum veto that had led the country to political disaster.
2) These nobles were represented in a parliament in which decision making rested on a unanimity rule known as the liberum veto.
In particular, every member was entitled to use the liberum veto to stop any legislation proposed or even to nullify a whole session of the Sejm.
After 1652, when the liberum veto was first used to dismiss a whole session of the Sejm, the quality of governance of the rzeczpospolyta and the country's economic performance declined (Davies 1984).
The dangerous liberum veto, which allowed a single member of the Sejm to vote against any decision and had crippled the democratic system, was abolished.
Even the liberum veto, which allows any single voter to veto a decision, has losers in the sense that those who want to adopt a policy can be prevented from doing so.
He faults the election of kings, democracy, liberum veto, pacta conventa [allowing the noble class the kind of democracy now enjoyed by all citizens in democratic countries], and King Henry Valesius's concession of power to the petty gentry.
Let us consider the liberum veto concept [the veto power of individual members of the legislative body].
Would it be too much to submit that it was thanks to the system of the liberum veto that Poland's strength grew for over two centuries?
Recall the Polish system of Liberum Veto in the seventeenth century.