Libriform Fibers

Libriform Fibers

 

greatly elongated wood cells with narrowed ends that make for wood’s durability and hardness.

The walls of libriform cells are lignified, with occasional oblique pores. In hardwoods (oak, ash), the walls are greatly thickened; this is less true in softwoods (linden, poplar). In some species (maple, elder), the cell walls are thin, holding live protoplast for long periods and containing nutrients (fats, starches). Sometimes, in their early stages of formation, libriform cells are divided by thin transverse septa that retain their living contents and nutrients for long periods (septal libriform). Libriform fibers developed evolutionarily from tracheids during the process of specialization of wood cells.

References in periodicals archive ?
Libriform fibers are often thought to be dead at maturity, but in fact, when liquid-preserved materials are studied, they prove to have living contents in an appreciable number of genera.
Wood background of stems composed of thin-walled wide libriform fibers (Fig.
ruspoliana Engl, with wide bands of wide water-storing libriform fibers rather than wide bands of axial parenchyma.
Roots have alternating bands of libriform fibers and paratracheal axial parenchyma bands (much as in stems of the bottle trees).
Stems slender, like those of the slender trees, with a similar preponderance of libriform fibers.
Larger, less juvenile stems have storied libriform fibers and axial parenchyma (Fig.
These cells have been reported to be libriform fibers, but SEM study reveals small borders (Fig.
Libriform fibers as well as vessels are storied in Peritoma (= Isomeris), which is a shrub with sufficient secondary xylem accumulation to show storying.
Monomorphic libriform fibers are present in most species.
27b), or an entirely fibrous background consisting of libriform fibers may be present, as in most of the woody Brassicaceae studied by Carlquist (1971).
Metcalfe & Chalk (1950) indicate that pits of "fibers" of wood of Brassicaceae may have simple or minutely bordered pits, and thus in the terminology used here, be libriform fibers or fiber-tracheids, respectively.
Small rhombic crystals are present in the libriform fibers of Parolinia ornata (Carlquist, 1971; Schweingruber, 2006).