chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride

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chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride

[¦klȯr·dī‚az·ə′pak‚sīd ‚hī·drə′klȯr‚īd]
(pharmacology)
C16H14ON3Cl A white crystalline conpound, soluble in water; the hydrochloride salt is used as a tranquilizer.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, she incorporates oral, history interviews with two pharmaceutical innovators, Frank Berger (who discovered Miltown) and Leo Sternbach (who discovered Librium and Valium).
In The Age of Anxiety, Tone discusses research published as early as 1961 that documented the potentially serious withdrawal reactions that could occur with medications such as Librium and Valium.
She was a bit groggy from the Librium but appeared upbeat about the experience.
By the mid 1970s, a decade after its introduction to the drugs market, Valium, or Diazepam, had replaced Librium as the most commonly prescribed tranquilizer.
Such people account for a high proportion of the consumption of minor tranquillizers like Librium and Valium.
In the 1960s, owner Arthur Sackler, a physician and pioneer in direct-to-consumer advertising, helped create the marketing buzz for Librium and Valium, the greatest pharmaceutical successes of their era.
The presentation will focus on solubility, volatility, three-dimensional structure, and acid base reactions involving stimulants such as cocaine and methamphetamine, depressants such as barbiturates, anti-depressants such as Librium and Valium and narcotics such as heroin and morphine.
The records reveal that Kennedy took codeine, Demerol and methadone for pain, Ritalin, a stimulant, meprobamate and librium for anxiety barbiturates for sleep, thyroid hormone, and injections of a blood derivative, gamma globulin, presumably to combat infections.
To help with beating the cravings for alcohol my doctor prescribed me Librium and I also took anti-depressants and sleeping tablets.
It has properties similar to the anti-anxiety drugs Librium and Valium, said June, who codeveloped the medication with James M.
For example, Valium, Librium, Tranxene, Centrax, Paxipam, Dalmane and Klonopin might be active for as long as 200 hours; Ativan, Xanax, Restoril and Doral are active for up to 24 hours; and Halcion and Serax, 6 to 9 hours.