Liddell Hart


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Liddell Hart

Sir Basil Henry. 1895--1970, British military strategist and historian: he advocated the development of mechanized warfare before World War II
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Liddell Hart, Max Hastings, Carlo d'Este, Cornelius Ryan, Anthony Beevor, Robert Citino, and some WW II films.
Liddell Hart, reflecting on his World War I experiences, insisted on the foolhardiness of direct attacks on an entrenched enemy.
BEATLES memorabilia, the Everyman Theatre's archive and the Liddell Hart fashion collection will be shown for the first time when Liverpool John Moores University opens its archives during Heritage Open Days next month.
The horror of men being And then there was the novelist, Captain Basil Liddell Hart, who served briefly on the western front, whose unsparing eviscerations of the Generals' tactics and heart-lessness appeared to seal its fate.
Perhaps the ultimate aim was wrong and he instead should do as Liddell Hart suggested a few weeks after Dieppe: "Any wise statesman should be disposed to consider the possibility of ending the war by agreement.
Yet he also defends Haig against the facile judgements of pseudo-historians such as Liddell Hart.
Or, as Sir Basil Henry Liddell Hart the British military historian and advisor during World War II described the military's role: The art of distributing and applying military means to fulfill the ends of policy.
After all, many classics of military theory and history were written by scholars who cut their teeth on the battlefield, such as Carl von Clausewitz, Mao Zedong, and Sir Basil Liddell Hart, who are among those with extensive military experience whose works are eminent today in the classrooms of our nation's service academies and war colleges.
In the first chapter of his 'Strategy, the indirect approach', Liddell Hart says: "More and more clearly has the fact emerged that a direct approach to one's mental object, or physical objective, along the 'line of natural expectation' for the opponent, has ever tended to, and usually produced negative results.
Despite references to the maritime theories of Julian Corbett and Alfred Mahan, Hugh Trenchard's air doctrines, and the armoured warfare studies of Basil Liddell Hart and J.
Among the collections stored there is that of military historian Sir Basil Liddell Hart.
Liddell Hart, "Why We Don't Learn From History" (London, 1946)