Lieutenant


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lieutenant

1. a military officer holding commissioned rank immediately junior to a captain
2. a naval officer holding commissioned rank immediately junior to a lieutenant commander

Lieutenant

 

a junior military officer rank in the armed forces of the USSR (introduced on Sept. 22, 1935) and in the majority of foreign states.

The title “lieutenant” originated in France in the 15th century to describe the post of deputy chief of a detachment, or deputy captain. In the second half of the 17th century lieutenant became a rank in the army and navy in France and other countries. The Russian Navy had the rank of lieutenant from 1701 to 1917.


Lieutenant

 

(poruchik). (1) A junior officer’s rank in the Russian Army above the rank of sublieutenant (podporuchik). The rank was instituted in the 17th century. The corresponding rank in cossack units was sotnik

(2) In the Polish Army (porucznik, “first lieutenant”) and in the Czechoslovak People’s Army (poručík, “lieutenant”), the rank of a junior officer.

References in classic literature ?
He addressed some words in a foreign language to his lieutenant, then turned to me.
It threw out a reddish, unequal light, sometimes brilliant, sometimes dull, and the tall shadow of the lieutenant was seen marching on the wall, in profile, like a figure by Callot, with his long sword and feathered hat.
And there hasn't been anyone in the room except the lieutenant and yourselves.
Well said, Werper," and Achmet Zek slapped his lieutenant upon the shoulder.
Lieutenant Smith-Oldwick realized in a quick glance that the direction of their approach and their proximity had cut off all chances of retreating to his plane, and he also understood that their attitude was entirely warlike and menacing.
At twenty I found myself a lieutenant in command of the aero-submarine Coldwater, of the SS-96 class.
These great depths," continued the lieutenant, "are not favorable for laying telegraphic cables.
There is the lieutenant, now, who might go quietly to bed if he chose, where no doubt he could stretch himself at his ease; but does he do it?
The new soldiers were now produced before the officer, who having examined the six-feet man, he being first produced, came next to survey Jones: at the first sight of whom, the lieutenant could not help showing some surprize; for besides that he was very well dressed, and was naturally genteel, he had a remarkable air of dignity in his look, which is rarely seen among the vulgar, and is indeed not inseparably annexed to the features of their superiors.
Esther, let me present Lieutenant Godfrey - my niece, Miss Fentolin; Mr.
Saying which the doctor scowled magnanimously on the stranger, and whispered his friend Lieutenant Tappleton.
Barth in 1849, and of Lieutenants Burton and Speke in 1858.