Lille

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Lille

(lēl), city (1990 pop. 178,301), capital of Nord dept., N France, near the Belgian border. With its central position in NW Europe, Lille became a great commercial, cultural, and manufacturing center, long known for its textile products—notably lisle (the name is derived from an older spelling of the city's name). Intense industrial expansion began in the 1960s, strengthened by the establishment (1967) of a metropolitan community uniting almost 90 towns with a total population of over 900,000. Steel, iron, metalworking, and chemicals were among the city's flourishing manufactures. By the 1990s, however, competiton from Southeast Asia and within Europe, including the former Eastern bloc, resulted in reduced production and high unemployment in the area.

Lille was the chief city of the county of Flanders, a brilliant residence of the 16th-century dukes of Burgundy, and (after 1668) the capital of French Flanders. Taken (1708) after a costly siege by Eugene of Savoy and the duke of Marlborough, it was restored to France in the Peace of Utrecht (1713). Among Lille's principal buildings are the huge citadel (17th cent.), one of the finest works of the French military engineer Vauban; the old stock exchange (17th cent.); several fine churches; and the unfinished cathedral (begun 1854). Lille has a large university, transferred there from Douai in 1808, and one of the most important art museums in Europe; its paintings include many of the best works of the Flemish, Dutch, French, and Spanish masters.

Lille

 

a city in northern France, on the Defile River (Schelde Basin). Capital of the department of Nord. Population, 190,500 (1968; with Roubaix and other metropolitan-area cities, approximately 900,000).

Lille is a transportation junction and a river port. It is the center of the northern industrial region of the country. Lille manufactures textiles (principally cotton), garments, and chemicals (acids, fertilizers, and dyes) and processes food. Heavy machine building is another important industry and is supported by the nearby metallurgical factories. There are a number of important banks in Lille and a university.

Lille

an industrial city in N France: the medieval capital of Flanders; forms with Roubaix and Tourcoing one of the largest conurbations in France. Pop.: 184 657 (1999)
References in periodicals archive ?
The European Biogasmax project, designed to promote the use of biogas produced from organic waste, notably as a fuel in buses, was launched on 23 March by the communaute urbaine de Lille, France.
The factory in Lille, France, that made Gauloise has silenced its mechanical cigarette rollers, according to Internet reports.
Calmette hospital in Lille, France, for acute respiratory failure related to community-acquired pneumonia.
England squads have also been selected for a European festival in Lille, France (March 17-26) and the Four Home Unions Festival - for players 18 and under on January 1 - between March 25 and April 1, making an overall total of 77 players in the first season of an integrated schools and clubs group.
Segway, LLC recently announced that the city of Lille, France and Keolis Group have launched the new "Oxygen Network," a transportation network comprising an oxygen station and oxygen boutique that rent zero-emission transportation devices to the public.
Eating fish--even just once a week--lowered the heart rates of healthy men in a new study from the Institut Pasteur in Lille, France, and the University of Belfast, Ireland.
The 55-year-old man on the flight to Lille, France, via Oran, Algeria, claimed that he was carrying a grenade which was in a box in his possession.
The study will continue to be led by the surgeons Jean Charles LeHuec, MD, PhD, from the Department of Orthopaedics at the University Hospital in Bordeaux, France, and Richard Assakar, MD, from the Department of Neurosurgery at the University Hospital in Lille, France.
Finance Minister Hikaru Matsunaga will represent Japan at the job conference in London, which follows three previous meetings in Detroit in March 1994, Lille, France, in April 1996 and Kobe, Japan, in November 1997.
POLICEMAN Andre Bulze landed in hot water - literally - when he wore a hot-water bottle under his uniform and the stopper flew out during a chase through Lille, France.
V<AEe>ronique Pauwels-Delassus is a faculty member of the Catholic University of Lille, France.
Prosecutors in Lille, France, have now ruled he and 13 other men must face trial at a date to be set next year.