liminality


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liminality

the situation of those in transit across the symbolic boundaries between statuses, especially in RITUALS (e.g. in RITE OF PASSAGE, CARNIVAL) – see A. van Gennep, The Rites of Passage (1909).
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This concept of liminality has been used by many scholars to describe struggles that individuals have when facing difficult transition moments in their life cycle or movements within one's social hierarchy.
Through liminality (like rites of passage, initiations, pilgrimages, etc.
That is not to say that liminality provides a fluid medium through which migrant women may transition easily.
Painted white, the gallery wall removed suggestions of context, much like the notion of liminality in a psychological sense.
The concept of liminality can be determined by neutrosophy, because the uncertainty that is maintained on an unknown level.
Her remarks about the poets' activity and interaction complement her study of alterity and liminality in their poems.
Even though Valerie Fehlbaum's essay does not seem to deal with liminality and space in recounting the experiences of Ella Hepworth Dixon and Elizabeth Banks as journalists, this chapter succeeds in showing how these women could move and travel from domesticity to the world outside.
Caroline Wanjiku Kihato uses her own migrant status--a Kenyan woman living in Johannesburg--as highly personalised introduction to the notion of "home" and the theoretical conceptualisation of liminality as social practice.
Elements of the inchoateness of her experience are expressed through the use of liminality and stream of consciousness.
We witness yet another paradox unfold, an engaging rhythm in the liminality of her creative act.
In cultural anthropology, liminality is a state of ambiguity or disorientation, when traditions and hierarchies are thrown into doubt and the future remains uncertain.
63-64 offer the Ad Herennium, hybridity, Thierry of Chartres, the soul's liminality, memory, reading, identification, the autobiographical mode, manuscript production, Walter Ong, rhetorical strategies, memory, desire, wonder, gifts, lack of closure, narrative, dismemberment, readerly imagination, and the passions.