lineage

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lineage

[′lin·ē·ij]
(genetics)
Individual descended from a common progenitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the late fourteenth to the mid-sixteenth centuries Huizhou lineages set about forming sacrificial and charitable land trusts, compiling lineage genealogies, and setting up ancestral halls "in unprecedented degree" (p.
One phylogenetic tree was constructed on the basis of the complete polyprotein-encoding nucleotide sequences of 32 WNV strains representing all previously described lineages for which complete polyprotein-encoding sequences are available.
Thus we see two important characteristics of Chan genealogy being established in the Sui: the linking of a Chinese master to the historical Buddha in order to allow that master to function as a new focus of authority and authenticity, and the employment of such lineages to create and maintain state patronage of particular communities.
Fast divergences are hard to reconstruct, so botanists have struggled to sort out the relationships among the more-recent lineages.
of Hong Kong) argues that the written genealogies and traditions of common ancestry in villages of southern China were introduced between the 16th and 18th centuries in order to bind the lineages to the central government.
NIDCR: All aspects of normal and abnormal craniofacial development, including genetics, complex origins of craniofacial disorders, cell lineages and differentiation, cell signaling and gene regulation, embryonic patterning, imaging, biomimetics, and new technologies for high-throughput genetic and protein screens.
Stanford University (Palo Alto, CA) has patented a substantially enriched mammalian hematopoietic cell subpopulation, which is characterized by progenitor cell activity for lymphoid lineages, but lacking the potential to differentiate into myeloid and erythroid lineages.
The two lineages are distinct, and there is little cross-reactivity between the two.
Lineages were an important element in Fuzhou society through at least the last millennium.
The captive population was descended from three founders until two other lineages, each descended from two founders, were recently added to the population.
For the purpose of comparison with Dowry Fund marriages, this elite has to be defined in terms of lineages (justified by Molho as appropriate to late medieval Florentine society), but this involves serious distortions.
These lines will, for the first time, provide scientists with a visual readout for tracking stem cell differentiation into different lineages and also enable scientists to study multiple genes involved in differentiation pathways, without having to sacrifice the cells.