Lipolytic Microorganisms

Lipolytic Microorganisms

 

microorganisms that are able to decompose vegetable and animal fats with the release of a considerable amount of energy. Among the lipolytic microorganisms are aerobic and anerobic bacteria of the genera Pseudomonas, Clostridium, and mold fungi (Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Aspergillus). The fat decomposition, which for the microorganisms is a source of carbon only (fats do not contain nitrogen), begins through lipase enzymes acting on the fats and is accompanied by the formation of glycerol, fatty acids, and water. Lipolytic microorganisms cause damage to food products and industrial materials that contain fats, for example, ordinary butter, fish, meat, edible vegetable oils, and drying oils.

References in periodicals archive ?
The selection of lipolytic microorganisms is justified by a climate of high temperatures in the state of Tocantins, Brazil, where microorganisms that produce thermostable enzymes that ensure great interest in industrial applications may be extant.
Although tributyrin may also be employed to select lipolytic microorganisms, vegetable oils, such as olive oil, may be emulsified and used as initiators in lipases production, since they are a substrate in the selection processes (CARDENAS et al.
The oily environment may provide a good environment for lipolytic microorganisms to flourish due to the unrecovered oil present in the effluent.