Literaturnoe Obozrenie

Literaturnoe Obozrenie

 

(Literary Review), a biweekly section on criticism and bibliography, part of the magazine Literaturnyi kritik; published in Moscow from 1936 to 1941. Intended for a broad circle of readers, Literaturnoe obozrenie provided comprehensive information about new Soviet and foreign literature and the publication of classics, criticism, and books on the theory and history of literature. In 1940–41 it was the organ of the Gorky Institute of World Literature.


Literaturnoe Obozrenie

 

(Literary Review), a monthly magazine of literary criticism and bibliography. The organ of the Writers’ Union of the USSR, published since 1973 in Moscow. It was created in accordance with the resolution of the Central Committee of the CPSU On Literary Criticism (1972), “for the purpose of further improving criticism and bibliographic work and propagandizing fiction.”

Intended for a broad readership, Literaturnoe obozrenie systematically covers the country’s current literary life. It reviews new releases in the multinational Soviet literature, as well as works by foreign writers that are published in the USSR. The permanent headings of the magazine include “Surveys,” “Reviews,” “The Writer’s Word,” and “Literature and Readers.” Circulation, more than 30,000 (1973).

References in periodicals archive ?
and Katya Chown (2007), "Iz predistorii Instituta zhivogo slovo 191824: protokoly zasedanii kursov khudozhestvennogo slovo," Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 96-106.
O Lili Kharazovoi [On Lily Charasoff]', Literaturnoe obozrenie 2: 17-8.
The World of the Soviet Man], (Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2001), 52-60.
by Evgeny Pavlov and Mark Williams (Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2005).
In addition to Inostrannaia literatura, articles about him appeared in other important literary journals, such as Voprosy literatury [Issues in Literature] and Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie [The New Literary Revue] and in chapters of scholarly books, sometimes as the main subject and sometimes as part of a wider analysis of American literature on the whole.
On the travels of these earlier Russian writers, see especially Aleksandr Etkind, Tolkovanie puteshestvii: Rossiia i Amerika v travelogakh i intertekstakh, Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2001.
Vatsuro's Goticheskii roman v Rossii (Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2002) for a fuller discussion of the 'Gothic wave' and the influence of individual Western Gothic authors upon Russian writers.
Press, 2001); Mikhail Dolbilov and Aleksei Miller, Zapadnye okrainy Rossiiskoi imperii (Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2006); Darius Staliunas, Making Russians: Meaning and Practice of Russification in Lithuania and Belarus after 1863 (Amsterdam-New York: Rodopi, 2007).
Intellectuals and the Revolution: 'For some time I wasn't sure whether I am an anti-Christ': Subjectivity, Autobiography and the Hot Memory of the Revolution" ["Intelektualy i revolutsiia: 'Odno vremia ia kolebalsia, ne antikhrist li ia': Sub"ektivnost', avtobiografiia i goriachaia pamiat' revolutsii"] Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie 73.
51) In "Russkie v Gollivude/Gollivud o Rossii," Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie 54:2 (2002): 403-28, Olga Matich outlines the Russian vogue in Hollywood of the 1920s and 1930s, while Bulgakowa discusses the Russian Western in connection with George W.