Literaturnoe Obozrenie

Literaturnoe Obozrenie

 

(Literary Review), a biweekly section on criticism and bibliography, part of the magazine Literaturnyi kritik; published in Moscow from 1936 to 1941. Intended for a broad circle of readers, Literaturnoe obozrenie provided comprehensive information about new Soviet and foreign literature and the publication of classics, criticism, and books on the theory and history of literature. In 1940–41 it was the organ of the Gorky Institute of World Literature.


Literaturnoe Obozrenie

 

(Literary Review), a monthly magazine of literary criticism and bibliography. The organ of the Writers’ Union of the USSR, published since 1973 in Moscow. It was created in accordance with the resolution of the Central Committee of the CPSU On Literary Criticism (1972), “for the purpose of further improving criticism and bibliographic work and propagandizing fiction.”

Intended for a broad readership, Literaturnoe obozrenie systematically covers the country’s current literary life. It reviews new releases in the multinational Soviet literature, as well as works by foreign writers that are published in the USSR. The permanent headings of the magazine include “Surveys,” “Reviews,” “The Writer’s Word,” and “Literature and Readers.” Circulation, more than 30,000 (1973).

References in periodicals archive ?
The World of the Soviet Man], (Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2001), 52-60.
by Evgeny Pavlov and Mark Williams (Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2005).
51) In "Russkie v Gollivude/Gollivud o Rossii," Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie 54:2 (2002): 403-28, Olga Matich outlines the Russian vogue in Hollywood of the 1920s and 1930s, while Bulgakowa discusses the Russian Western in connection with George W.
Previously published in Russian as volume 1 of Proshedshee vremya nesovershennogo vida (Moscow: Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie, 2001), the text is translated by Alice Nakhimovsky (Russian and Jewish studies, Colgate U.
6) Vladimir Kaganskii, Kul'turnyi landshaft: Sovetskoe obitaemoe prostranstvo (Moscow: Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 2001), 9.
In public discussions, particularly in the pages of the popular academic journal Novoe Literaturnoe Obozrenie, critics began to refer to a phenomenon that they termed Russia's "other poetry" (drugaia poeziia).
25) Evgenii Shklovskii, "Ne dat' stikhu ostyt'," Literaturnoe Obozrenie, 11 (1988), p.