Loamy Sand

Loamy Sand

 

an unconsolidated sandy-clayey sedimentary rock containing 3–10 percent by weight clay particles with diameters less than 0.005 mm. In soil science, loamy sands with clay percentages near the upper limit are called heavy, and those with clay percentages near the lower limit are called light. Loamy coarse sand, loamy fine sand, and loamy very fine sand are distinguished, depending on the grain size of the constituent sand or silt (aleurite). The mineralogical composition of loamy sand varies: all contain considerable quantities of quartz, and the more clayey types contain clay minerals, such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. The term “loamy sand” is usually applied to continental deposits; marine deposits of corresponding composition are classified in a group of sands that have different proportions of clay.

References in periodicals archive ?
The project area is characterized by moderate to strong loamy sand.
The modem soil at this site belongs to the Oruanui loamy sand series within the Podzolic Orthic Pumice Soil subgroup (Hewitt 2010) and is a mesic Andie Haplorthod according to the United States Soil Taxonomy (Soil Survey Staff 2010; Rijkse 2005).
The soil was collected from a Norfolk loamy sand (thermic Typic Kandiudults) site in the lower coastal plain region of North Carolina.
The upper till is greyish-brown or grey, in places containing yellowish loamy sand with poorly rounded carbonate clasts 8-40 cm in diameter.
Soil type in Field 2 (TIF) was a Metz loamy sand (sandy, mixed, thermic Typic Xerofluvents).
6 milligrams of alum-calcium carbonate per gram of sediment suppressed phosphorus release by 92 percent in sandy sediments and by 72 percent in clay loam and loamy sand sediments.
Soil texture was loamy sand and electrical conductivity (EC) of saturated extract was 3.
This the wetland achieves through the plant species which plays important role in the treatment processes as well as the soil type which spans from sandy loam and loamy sand.
The sand pond areas occupy a position on the landscape where the Chelsea fine sand and Roby loamy sand converge.
Research has shown the combination of reduced tillage and the use of cover crops increases infiltration rates by as much as 35 to 40 percent compared to conventional tillage for loamy sand and sandy loam soils.
All texture classes of soils were predicted to sustain fracturing except loamy sand and sand.