locative

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locative

(lŏk`ətĭv) [Lat.,=placing], in the grammar of certain languages (e.g., Sanskrit), the casecase,
in language, one of the several possible forms of a given noun, pronoun, or adjective that indicates its grammatical function (see inflection); in inflected languages it is usually indicated by a series of suffixes attached to a stem, as in Latin amicus,
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 referring to location. Nouns in this case are often translatable into English phrases beginning with at, in, or on.
References in periodicals archive ?
b]: market-LOC FAITHL PREDICT ECONOMY market = Instrument * [right arrow] market = Goal Tableau 3: Optimization procedure of locative case marking in Marathi PROD: location = house's inside FAITHL PREDICT ECONOMY [left and right arrow] a.
In sopmepma 'show', the case marking of the participants also changes, as the G argument receives a locative case, so that the resulting structure belongs to the indirective frame.
Example (14a) illustrates the indirective frame: The T argument triggers object agreement, while the G argument is in the locative case.
Some languages have only one series of basic locative cases (locative, ablative, allative, like Warlpiri or Basque), others have two or up to seven series, for different locations, like Uralic and Caucasian languages, leading to rich case systems.
For example, languages that use locative case markers as well as spatial nouns (like Turkish), encode a general spatial relation between the two entities when only the general locative case marker -da 'at' is used.
It is also possible that locative case markers appear on the verb.
In contrast, the locative case that marks the semi-complement of quasi-adpositional constructions contributes to the conceived nature of the relationship that prevails between the landmark and the trajector.
Besides the Locative case marker--(V)n, there are other elements in the language that can be used to indicate Ground: the Ablative postposition lots' (as in the example above), the Allative postposition ita (6) and the Dative markers--(V)s and -ki.
In the following example from Warlpiri, the modifying nominal ngapa 'water, waterhole' carries both the locative case marker, which indicates its semantic role, as well as the dative case marker, which marks it as modifying the dative argument yankirri-ki 'emu-DAT'.
The same characteristic is treated as unstable in sentences where the verb olema 'be' is accompanied by an adverb (23b), a noun in a locative case (22c), (24b), as well in possessive constructions
mika 'what' in internal locative cases with a head * * referring to the owner of a place (4.
In Udmurt language, several locative cases can be involved in the category of possession.