Lockerbie


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Lockerbie

(lŏk`ərbē), village (1991 pop. 3,892), Dumfries and Galloway, S Scotland, site of a 1988 airplane crash. On Dec. 21, 1988, a New York–bound Pan Am Boeing 747 exploded in flight as a result of a terrorist bomb and crashed in and around Lockerbie. The crash killed all 259 people aboard and 11 on the ground. In Nov., 1991, the U.S. Dept. of Justice indicted two Libyan intelligence agents for the bombing; Libya was also implicated in the similar 1989 bombing of a French UTA DC-10 over Niger in which 170 people died. After the imposition (1992) of economic sanctions by the United Nations and long negotiations, Libya turned the suspects over in 1999, and they were sent to the Netherlands for trial (under Scottish law). After a nine-month trial, one of the two defendants was found guilty (2001) and sentenced to life imprisonment; the other was acquitted. In 2003, after Libya acknowledged involvement in the Lockerbie bombing and agreed to settlements with the families of the victims of the two bombings, the UN Security Council lifted its sanctions. A Scottish judicial review board, however, ruled in 2007 that the convicted defendant, Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi, had legitimate grounds for a new appeal based on new evidence and questionable testimony at the trial. Megrahi, terminally ill with cancer, began a new appeal in 2009 but subsequently withdrew it and was released on compassionate grounds; he died in 2012.

Bibliography

See A. Gerson and J. Adler, The Price of Terror (2001).

Lockerbie

a town in SW Scotland, in Dumfries and Galloway: scene (1988) of the UK's worst air disaster when a jumbo jet was brought down by a terrorist bomb, killing 270 people, including eleven residents of the town
References in periodicals archive ?
Halliday Trophy The Wullie Halliday Trophy came to a climax at Lockerbie on Thursday, March 8, with Lockerbie three shots up after playing at Dumfries.
The Lockerbie Bombing occurred on 21 December 1988, when a bomb was detonated on Pan Am flight 103 shortly after it departed from London Heathrow for New York's JFK Airport.
He is the only person found guilty of blowing up Pan Am flight 103 over Lockerbie in December 1988, killing 270.
Libyan Abdelbaset al-Megrahi was the only plotter convicted of the attack on Pan Am flight 103 over Lockerbie, south west Scotland.
George White, who was 83, was a paramedic in Lockerbie on the night of the PanAm 103 bombing in December 1988.
Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister for Arab-African Affairs Hossein Amir Abdollahian on Wednesday condemned Qatari broadcaster al-Jazeera for accusing Iran of Lockerbie explosion as smokescreen campaign at the behest of the Israeli regime, and said the report was fabricated in line with the Zionist regimes lies.
In a cogent new book, Scotland's Shame: Why Lockerbie still matters, John Ashton reinforces the case made in his magisterial study, Megrahi: You are My Jury (2012) -- that Megrahi's conviction by three Scottish judges at Camp Zeist in the Netherlands in January 2001 -- had no credibility.
What we the people of Lockerbie in this area will never tire of saying is we welcome you once again to this place where you know you are always welcome.
In the play "The Women of Lockerbie'' by Deborah Brevoort, a grieving American mother travels to the small Scottish town of Lockerbie where Pan Am flight 103 had crashed to the ground after being blown up by a bomb on Dec.
Abu Talb, now 59, has always denied any involvement with the Lockerbie bombing.
The Foreign Office disclosed that members of the Lockerbie investigation team, including officers from Scotland's Dumfries and Galloway Police, had visited the north African state this week.
BRITISH police investigating the 1988 Lockerbie bombing are to visit Libya for the first time.