Lockerbie

(redirected from Lockerbie, Scotland)
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Lockerbie

(lŏk`ərbē), village (1991 pop. 3,892), Dumfries and Galloway, S Scotland, site of a 1988 airplane crash. On Dec. 21, 1988, a New York–bound Pan Am Boeing 747 exploded in flight as a result of a terrorist bomb and crashed in and around Lockerbie. The crash killed all 259 people aboard and 11 on the ground. In Nov., 1991, the U.S. Dept. of Justice indicted two Libyan intelligence agents for the bombing; Libya was also implicated in the similar 1989 bombing of a French UTA DC-10 over Niger in which 170 people died. After the imposition (1992) of economic sanctions by the United Nations and long negotiations, Libya turned the suspects over in 1999, and they were sent to the Netherlands for trial (under Scottish law). After a nine-month trial, one of the two defendants was found guilty (2001) and sentenced to life imprisonment; the other was acquitted. In 2003, after Libya acknowledged involvement in the Lockerbie bombing and agreed to settlements with the families of the victims of the two bombings, the UN Security Council lifted its sanctions. A Scottish judicial review board, however, ruled in 2007 that the convicted defendant, Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi, had legitimate grounds for a new appeal based on new evidence and questionable testimony at the trial. Megrahi, terminally ill with cancer, began a new appeal in 2009 but subsequently withdrew it and was released on compassionate grounds; he died in 2012.

Bibliography

See A. Gerson and J. Adler, The Price of Terror (2001).

Lockerbie

a town in SW Scotland, in Dumfries and Galloway: scene (1988) of the UK's worst air disaster when a jumbo jet was brought down by a terrorist bomb, killing 270 people, including eleven residents of the town
References in periodicals archive ?
Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi ordered the 1988 bombing of Pan Am flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, a former Libyan cabinet minister was quoted as saying by a Swedish newspaper on Wednesday.
Rumors have circulated that BP winning the contract to work in Libya was tied to the release of Libyan national Abdel Baset Al Megrahi, one of the masterminds behind the bombing of Pan-Am Flight 103, which exploded over Lockerbie, Scotland in 1988, killing almost 260 people.
In 2001, Megrahi was ordered to serve 27 years in prison for the bombing of Pan Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland on December 21 1988.
Nicole Boulanger, 21, was among 36 Syracuse University students on the Boeing 747 returning from studying in London when a bomb authorities said was in a Toshiba radio cassette recorder in a suitcase exploded, killing the 259 people onboard, mostly Americans, and 11 people on the ground in Lockerbie, Scotland.
But that plan was scrapped when it drew widespread outrage and legal challenges in New Jersey, which lost dozens of residents in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, that was widely believed to have been the work of Libyan intelligence.
Over twenty years ago, a terrorist bombing killed 270 people aboard Pan Am 103 on a flight over Lockerbie, Scotland.
Pan Am Flight 103 is blown up over Lockerbie, Scotland, killing a total of 270 people.
LONDON * A priest who served in Lockerbie, Scotland, at the time Pan Am Flight 103 was blown from the sky by terrorists has welcomed the release from jail of the only person convicted of the attack.
Al-Megrahi, 57, was imprisoned and sentenced to life in prison in January 2001 after being charged with 270 counts of murder for his role in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland.
Megrahi, the former Libyan intelligence officer, was convicted in a specially convened Scottish court at Camp Zeist in The Netherlands in 2001, of murdering 270 people when a bomb he planted on Pan-Am Flight 103 blew up over Lockerbie, Scotland, on Dec.
August 20, 2009 (KHARTOUM) -- The Sudanese government today welcomed the decision by Scotland to free a terminally ill Libyan man convicted of the 1988 Pan Am airliner bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland.
Due to the increase in business in frozen and chilled, they have just completed the purchase of a site in Lockerbie, Scotland, which will become a major second satellite depot for Kestrel.