Long Barrows


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Long Barrows

 

the burial remains of the Krivichi, dating from the sixth to 10th centuries. They are common in the upper reaches of the Zapadnaia Dvina, Dnieper, and Lovat’ rivers and in the basins of the Velikaia River and Pskov Lake. The barrows are earthen mounds, oval and elongated or bank-like in form, containing the remains of several cremations. They are usually 15-80 m long and 7-15 m wide with an average height of 0.8-1.5 m. Usually they contain from two to ten, less often 11 to 20, burials in small piles of charred human bones (sometimes in clay vessels). Occasionally metal objects, ornaments, buckles, and knives are found along with the remains. Long barrows were gradually superseded by round barrows containing single cremations.

REFERENCES

Cherniagin, N. N. “Dlinnye kurgany i sopki.” In the book Materialy i issledovaniia po arkheologii SSSR, no. 6. Moscow, 1941.
Tarakanova, S. A. “Dlinnye i udlinennye kurgany.” In the collection Sovetskaia arkheologiia, vol. 19. Moscow, 1954.
Sedov, V. V. “Krivichi.” Sovetskaia arkheologiia, 1960, no. 1.
References in periodicals archive ?
Earthern long barrows and timber structures: aspects of the early mortuary in Denmark.
Their bones were buried in the oldest part of the mound, known as a chambered long barrow, and researchers have now narrowed the date of their burials to between 3590 and 3560 BC.
People of the long barrow is an accessible and well-illustrated volume focusing mostly on southern English long barrows but also including information from several chambered long cairns in Wales and Scotland (table 9).
Estimated at 6,000 years old, based on the dates of similar tombs around the UK, the long barrows are also the oldest elements of the complex.
According to English Heritage, Neolithic long barrows, Roman towns and villas, Anglo-Saxon cemeteries, medieval field systems -a patchwork of the last thousand years -have suffered or are still at risk.
English Heritage launched its campaign as it feels archaeological sites - including Neolithic long barrows, Roman towns and villas, Anglo-Saxon cemeteries, medieval field systems - are being destroyed.
Archaeologists have dated the two Neolithic long barrows to 3500BC, when farmers first started to grow crops in Kent's Medway Valley.
She was able to identify the two tombs with troughs on each side, known as long barrows, typical of Neolithic burial sites.
As she noted, the massive terminal bank would have resembled a long barrow, a feature that is echoed by the Thickthorn Terminal of the Dorset Cursus, where the cursus bank has two long barrows aligned upon it, forming a continuous line of mounds (Barrett et al.
Field, an archeological investigator with English Heritage, analyzes the placement and purpose of the long barrows, distinctive mounds of earth scattered across the countryside.
The site, still under construction in a round-the-clock operation which Mr Hoon described as 'astonishing,' has 15 lined 80-metre long barrows like the one above.
According to a report in Alpha Galileo, Dr Helen Wickstead and her colleagues were stunned and delighted to find the previously undiscovered Neolithic tombs, also known as long barrows at a site at Damerham, Hampshire.