Cerambycidae

(redirected from Longhorn beetle)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Cerambycidae

[se·rəm′bī·sə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The longhorn beetles, a family of coleopteran insects in the superfamily Chrysomeloidea.

Cerambycidae

 

a family of insects of the order Coleoptera. The body is oblong and measures 3-180 mm long. The antennae are often quite long, and the jaws are well developed. The body coverings are hard and diversely colored (often speckled). The larvae are fleshy, with a very large prothorax and special bulges—“motor callosities”—on the abdominal segments. The legs of most are not developed. The larvae live in wood (on which they also feed), occasionally in the stems of herbaceous plants, and less often in the soil (where they feed on roots). The development of the larvae usually lasts about a year, sometimes longer.

There are about 20,000 species distributed throughout the world, the most numerous being in the tropics. About 800 species are found in the USSR, of which the largest is the Callipogon relictus, which may measure up to 10 cm long. Many cerambycids are wood and lumber pests. In coniferous forests representatives of the genus Monochamus inflict severe damage. Oak trees are damaged by the Cerambyx cerdo. The Hylotrupes bajulus destroys wooden structures and telegraph poles in the forested steppe and steppe regions. Pests of structures and wooden articles are destroyed by treating the infested wood; preventive measures include impregnating the wood with beetle repellants or long-acting insecticides. In forests, control reduces mainly to destroying the infested trees and to the timely removal from the forest of dead trees, windfalls, freshly sawed lumber, and deadwood.

N. N. PLAVIL’sHCHIKOV

References in periodicals archive ?
Even though our information about the dispersal behavior of Asian longhorn beetles is still quite limited in addition to frequently concerns only a few species of newly invaders such as A.
In coastal North Carolina the smaller Japanese cedar longhorn beetle cropped up in 1997 on a dying tree in a residential area.
A female longhorn beetle typically deposits from 30 to 80 eggs under the bark of a tree.
Since January, Asian longhorn beetles have been found in wood packing material from China in more than 20 U.
The Asian longhorn beetle was first discovered on maple, horsechestnut, and elm trees in Brooklyn, New York, in October 1996.
As a federally-listed threatened species living in vanishing shrubland along riverbanks, the Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle stood to lose one of its last refuges if the engineering work proceeded.
The striking face, striped antennae, legs and body of an Asian longhorn beetle is on the cover of "Beetle Busters: A Rogue Insect and the People Who Track It,'' written by Burns with photographs by Harasimowicz.
Experts from the Property Care Association are keeping a watching brief to track any reported sightings of the house longhorn beetle - and have briefed its members across the UK to report any sightings of the insect.
Funds are also granted for the control of two types of beetles, the Asian longhorn beetle in Germany and Italy and the Chinese longhorn beetle in Italy.
Keen gardener Cath Brook couldn't believe her eyes when she discovered the unusual Citrus Longhorn Beetle nestling in her beautiful tree.
The citrus longhorn beetle has been brought into the UK on Japanese Maple or Acer plants imported from China via the Netherlands and distributed by mail order.
Eggs and larvae of insects such as the emerald ash borer, Asian longhorn beetle, and sirex woodwasp can travel hidden in firewood.