Lookout

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lookout

[′lu̇k‚au̇t]
(building construction)
A horizontal wood framing member that extends out from the studs to the end of rafters and overhangs a part of a roof, such as a gable.

Lookout

Rafter, bracket, or joist at the ridge of a roof that projects beyond an end-wall of a building: may support an overhanging portion of the roof or cornice.

lookout

1. A rafter or joist at the ridge of a roof that projects beyond an end wall of a building; may support the overhanging portion of the roof or cornice; also called a rafter lookout.
2. An elevated place or structure that provides a wide view for observation of the countryside, particularly against marauders.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his book Fire Lookouts of the Northwest, author Ray Kresek calls Lincoln County, in northwest Montana, "the last frontier [for fire towers].
com)-- In appreciation of many years of community service and valuable conservation efforts, WTI has renewed its commitment of financial support for the Keller Peak Fire Lookout and Butler Peak Fire Lookout through the National Forest Association's Adopt-A-Lookout Program.
Washington has 107 lookouts standing, but only 30 are staffed.
The tall windows of the nearby fire lookout tower rattle and shake.
SANTA CLARITA -- The local sheriff's station received 157 fireworks complaints Tuesday night, but made just one arrest -- possibly because revelers were on the lookout for patrols.
lookouts be required to demonstrate elementary forms of non-swimming rescues.
The Lane County Historical Society contracted him in 1982 to write a book about lookouts.
If in the two wooden towers, lookouts would be in danger if a fire broke out, according to a Forest Service official.
At the park today you can imagine Cheyenne teepees dotting the grass 200 years ago or lookouts hidden in the hills, despite the suburbs that now cover them.
Although this cabin is on the national historic lookout register, the accommodations are not as primitive as at most fire lookouts.
The lookouts, built on geographic high points, often consisted of little more than wooden platforms in trees.