megaphone

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Related to Loudhailer: megaphone

megaphone

[′meg·ə‚fōn]
(acoustics)
A conical or rectangular horn used to amplify or direct the sound of a speaker's voice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Experimental results of contact discharge to the whole product Screen Keystroke Power loudhailer 2 kV flicker invalidation Reset Work 4 kV Dark invalidation Reset invalidation 6 kV invalidation invalidation Reset invalidation 8 kV invalidation invalidation Reset invalidation 10kV invalidation invalidation Reset invalidation Table 2.
This includes the long range acoustic device which will be deployed during the Games primarily to be used in the loudhailer mode as part of the measures to achieve a maritime stop on the Thames.
PC Morris then used loudhailer equipment fitted to the car to negotiate with the offender.
The Hailing Station was a manned building which saw a worker use a loudhailer to guide ships up the River Liffey during bad weather.
The prosecution says he was plainly calling for murder and stirring up race hate as he addressed the crowd using a loudhailer.
We ended up parking on the Heath, from where it is a bizarre route to get to the silver ring entrance - up the course, under a tunnel, push through the massive crowd queueing for general admission, avoid the man with the loudhailer trying to pacify the disgruntled people waiting to get in, down past the old buildings back to the bottom of the course, and then in.
Neil Clague, who has a five-year-old at the school, climbed the roof with a loudhailer.
Tenders are invited for Supply of Loudhailer Mega Phone AM21S with 20 watts of power is used to produce noticeable loud noise during emergencies or when speaking to large crowds
As the decision to hang Guru emerged, security forces imposed a curfew in rural areas parts of Indian-administered Kashmir, with the announcement made by loudhailer as police patrolled the streets.
Using a loudhailer, he told protestors they had fought to develop a strong industry that would be badly hit as customers could not afford the VAT introduction.
Negotiators were last night using a loudhailer to urge the man, thought to be Barry Horspool, 61, to talk.
One person shouted slogans through a loudhailer, angrily denouncing the "war crimes" statement, while another was holding up a large picture of Alliot-Marie with a crude red line drawn across her face.