Louis VI


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Related to Louis VI: Louis XVI, Louis XIV, Marie Antoinette

Louis VI

(Louis the Fat), 1081–1137, king of France (1108–37). He succeeded his father, Philip I, with whom he was associated in government from c.1100. He firmly established his authority within the royal domain, suppressing brigandage by robber barons and besieging their castles, and punishing wrongdoers. He continued his father's policy of opposing the English in Normandy and was almost continuously at war with King Henry I (1109–13, 1116–20, 1123–35); he often met with defeat, but his resistance checked a greater English advance. In 1124 he called up forces from far-flung regions of France; with strong support from the nobles he resisted the invasion of Holy Roman Emperor Henry V, who had come to the aid of Henry I. As a part of his plan for strengthening royal authority, Louis favored the church, liberally endowing its enterprises and selecting churchmen—notably the Abbé SugerSuger
, 1081–1151, French cleric and statesman, abbot of Saint-Denis from 1122, minister of kings Louis VI and Louis VII. Born into a peasant family and educated at the abbey of Saint-Denis, Suger was noted for his financial ability and his talent for conciliation.
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—as his ministers; he was vigorous, however, in enforcing his privilege of interference in ecclesiastical affairs. To gain support from the towns, he began to grant them royal charters. He obtained a foothold in Guienne (Aquitaine) by marrying his son Louis (his successor as Louis VII) to the heiress of the duchy, Eleanor of AquitaineEleanor of Aquitaine
, 1122?–1204, queen consort first of Louis VII of France and then of Henry II of England. Daughter and heiress of William X, duke of Aquitaine, she married Louis in 1137 shortly before his accession to the throne.
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. His enforcement of order and justice made Louis popular with the middle classes, the peasantry, and the clergy. Suger's Vie de Louis VI Le Gros (tr. 1964) is the standard monography for the history of Louis's reign.
References in periodicals archive ?
31) Stephen resumed his position as royal chancellor in 1132, holding it to the death of Louis VI in 1137.
In his notes on this passage, David Luscombe does not offer any explanation as to why Abelard should have chosen Melun, other than claiming that Philip I and Louis VI used it as a centre for royal government, referring for further background to Bautier's study.
It seems, however, that the de Garlande brothers had already effectively aligned themselves as supporting Louis VI even before Philips death.
A month later, Louis VI settled affairs more in favour of Saint-Martin of Tours.
While Louis VI was holding court at Melun in March 1111, the Ile-de-la-cite had been attacked by Norman forces led by Robert of Meulan, with bridges destroyed.
Suger, also a friend of Joscelin, similarly never mentions William of Champeaux in his history of Louis VI.
80) On 18 April 1112, a charter was drawn up by Louis VI (with Stephen de Garlande as his chancellor) officially establishing an order of regular canons based around Puiseaux, some 163 kilometres south of Paris, roughly midway on the road towards Orleans.
Louis VI became as heavy as his father from overeating and was so obese that by the time he was 46 he could not mount his horse.