Lucilius


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Lucilius

Gaius . ?180--102 bc, Roman satirist, regarded as the originator of poetical satire
References in periodicals archive ?
Though each letter is addressed to Lucilius, Seneca notes early on "the work that I am doing is for posterity .
Poem 1 is not, however, the sole to allude to Horace's relation to Lucilius.
The previous two were Feller & Gotting's 1966 Northwestern article, stating that the Second Amendment is only for the National Guard, see Feller & Gotting, supra note 144; and a 1915 Harvard piece from retired Maine Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Lucilius Emery, arguing that the Second Amendment is for the entire militia, but only for them, and therefore the Amendment poses no barrier to disarming women, children, the elderly, or the disabled, see Lucilius A.
Seneca's fictional moral philosophical letters to Lucilius depicted reading and writing as forms of violence with potent contemporary political valency; to be influenced by this epistolary style was to develop a combative understanding of literature.
00) by Susanna Braund: and "A Roman Verse Satire Reader: Selections from Lucilius.
A monotongacao era tao comum em latim vulgar que os falantes, por vezes, aplicavam hipercorrecao, como registra a sentenca: "ac rustici pappum Mesium, non Maesium, a quo Lucilius scribit' [9] (Os camponeses pronunciam Maesium e nao mesium, questao sobre a qual Lucilio escreveu).
13) In the first three books, Epicurus is cited in the form of aphorisms for Lucilius to digest.
which [words], deservedly I will recite that [passage in] Lucilius in a
In his 88th letter to Lucilius (section 8) Seneca attempts to identify the true subject matter of liberal studies and makes this backhanded comment about what he perceives as a deficiency in the current curriculum: "Why inquire whether Penelope was pure or had deceived her contemporaries?
identifies himself as a follower of Lucilius who is half-Lucanian and
Or as Seneca reminded his friend Lucilius, "You have to persevere and fortify your pertinence until the will to good becomes a disposition to good" (Epistulae morales, XVI).