Luggnagg

Luggnagg

imaginary island; inhabitants immortal but lack immortal health. [Br. Lit.: Gulliver’s Travels]
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References in classic literature ?
This island of Luggnagg stands south-eastward of Japan, about a hundred leagues distant.
A gentleman of distinction said to me, "that since the ships bound for Luggnagg could not be ready in less than a month, it might be no disagreeable amusement for me to take a trip to the little island of Glubbdubdrib, about five leagues off to the south-west.
Ever since Jonathan Swift's Gulliver travelled to the nation of Luggnagg, where the "struldbrugs" age but never die, writers have used the notion of immortality to examine the possibilities and limits of a human life.
Part III of which novel is entitled A Voyage to Laputa, Balnibarbi, Luggnagg and Glubbdubdrib?
Gulliver leaves Glubbdubdrib for Luggnagg with another guide who possesses "the language of the Balnibarbi" (442).
El capitan Gulliver, amen de sus conocidas descripciones de Lilliput y Brobdingnag (mejor conocidos como el pais de los enanos y el pais de los gigantes, respectivamente) hizo interesantes descripciones, si bien menos conocidas, de tierras tan lejanas como laputa, Balnibarbi, Luggnagg, Glubbdubdrib, Japon y el pais de los Houyhnhnms (o pais de los caballos).
Los viajes, sin embargo, se hacen a otros lugares, como por ejemplo a Brobdingnag; a Laputa, Balnibarbi, Luggnagg y el Japon; y, finalmente, al pais de los houyhnhnms.
El tercero de los viajes a las islas de Laputa, Balnibarbi, Luggnagg, Glubbdubdrib y Japon le sirve al autor para poner en tela de juicio y censurar los supuestos avances del conocimiento cientifico.
Also easily contrasted to Exams of Merit is the simple procedure of applying poison to the dust of the throne room in Luggnagg (175).
At the end of the Third Voyage, when Gulliver sails from Luggnagg to Japan, where he hopes he can get a ship back to Europe, he poses as a Dutchman because he knows the Dutch are the only Europeans permitted to enter Japan.
I know of one attempt to tackle that question: Jonathan Swift's harrowing description in Gulliver's Travels of the Struldbrugs or "Immortals," who "sometimes, though very rarely" happen to be born in the kingdom of Luggnagg.
Visiting Luggnagg, Gulliver, after describing an imaginary immortality of constant learning and growing wisdom, is shown a group of immortals called Struldbrugs, who are grotesque, pitiable creatures, senile for centuries, but destined never to die.