Luo

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Luo

 

a people of Kenya, living primarily along the shores of Lake Victoria. The Luo are closely related to the Gaya (Giranga) and Dama. Population, 1.4 million (1967 estimate). The Luo language belongs to the Nilotic group. Most Luo have preserved their traditional beliefs, although some are Muslims and Christians. In some regions the Luo live together with the Bantu Luhya, with whose material and spiritual culture they have much in common. Their chief occupation is farming (corn, millet, sorghum), but many migrate seasonally to cities in search of work.

References in periodicals archive ?
A twenty-six-year-old Luo male summed up the comments of his Kamba, Luhya and Somali neighbours: 'When I dream about the future, I think about how Kenya as a country can be one thing without many tribes.
Moreover, members of the Luo are believed to be educated, knowing English and preoccupied with conspicuous consumption.
Oriaro, some of the Luo cultural practices can more effectively help contain the spread of HIV/AIDS in the county than the current trend of promoting mass male circumcision which will make youths more reckless in their sexual behaviour.
Ao diagnosticar areas sem rede de esgoto na area de recarga do aquifero, verificou-se que a LUOS do municipio de Santa Maria nao esta sendo totalmente cumprida, pois esta lei dispoe que os usos do solo existentes na Area de Conservacao Natural do Aquifero Arenito Basal Santa Maria podem existir desde que nao gerem grandes impactos ou traumas ambientais.
A win by Odinga would make him the country's first Luo president, a feat never accomplished by his father, Oginga Odinga, who was Kenya's first vice president and himself a hero of the anti-colonial movement.
but, historically, every time the Luo and the Kikuyu have been on different sides there has been violence," said Mzalendo Kibunjia, who heads a national agency formed to reconcile tribes after the violence.
Moi was the leader of the Kenya Africa Democratic Union party, which was comprised of Africans--mainly from communities that felt marginalized by the political dominance of the Kikuyus and Luos the largest two communities--European and Asians--dismantled itself and joined Kenyatta's ruling party in 1964.
The subjective takes precedence over the objective as the example of the Alur, a group ethnically related to the Luo of Kenya, who put "great verbal stress" on that which does "not obtain in practice" (Southall 1970:238) illustrate.
The Luos and the neighboring communities say, for example, that the only good Kikuyu is a dead one.
In the Rift Valley, a crowd of Luos demanded a man's ID card, determined from his name he was Kikuyu and killed him.