lupin

(redirected from Lupines)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

lupin

(US), lupine
any leguminous plant of the genus Lupinus, of North America, Europe, and Africa, with large spikes of brightly coloured flowers and flattened pods

lupin

leguminous plant; arouses passion. [Plant Folklore: Boland, 9]

lupin

traditional symbol of voracity. [Plant Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]
References in periodicals archive ?
On an organic dairy farm in Boistfort Valley, Washington, surrounded by the foothills of the coast range, Kincaid's lupine thrives among a herd of cows.
Working at the ARS Poisonous Plant Research Laboratory in Logan, Utah, chemist Richard Keeler (now retired) started to identify alkaloids in lupines that contributed to the onset of CCS.
In acceptably large Fender's blue populations where lupines are overtopped by tall grasses, active season mowing in a portion of the sites could occur without placing the entire population at risk, providing conscientious mow timing, treatment size, and mow deck height is addressed.
At the freeway ramp in question, there is also a massive display of royal blue lupine (Lupinus), a California native.
We modeled lupine survival with a hierarchical family of "one-hit dose response" models to interpret the results of the experiment.
Growing in the bare sand areas favored by lupines are other unusual plants such as ground pine and pale grey-green patches of reindeer moss lichen, as well as the red-topped british soldier lichens.
The Karner blue's problems stem from its adaptation to life in sandy pine-oak savanna, where natural fires spur the growth of wild lupine, the only plant that Karner caterpillars eat.
She and her assistants watched the insects' behavior inside areas with lupines and outside such prime habitat.
Aside from the famous orange poppies, consider clarkias, monkey flowers and lupines.
On a fine spatial scale, mortality of isolated islands of lupines growing within mostly native coastal prairie promotes subsequent invasion into dead lupine patches by weedy introduced plants (Maron and Connors 1996).
The undulating ridges which surrounded it were brilliant with blue lupines and velvet-leaf sunflowers.
About 200 species of lupines grow in all kinds of habitats.