Lusitanian


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Lusitanian

[‚lü·sə′tan·ē·ən]
(geology)
Lower Jurassic geologic time.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Lusitanian church is small, its total membership less than half the number of the worshippers in Cape Town seven years ago, so our service, in a local gymnasium, was also relatively small.
It also seemed important in Portugal to pray that the issues that once divided the Lusitanian church from its Roman forbears might also be dissolved in the ocean of God's unity.
All of the species continue to exist in the Lusitanian marine province (see also Leonardi 1935: 27), which includes the Mediterranean Sea, the Black Sea and the Atlantic Ocean off the North African and southern European coasts (Sabelli 1980: 45-7).
But since there is nothing more tedious than to have to listen to the labyrinthine genealogical connection of other people's families, suffice it to say that in the middle of the Portuguese crisis, the Lusitanian connection in Segovia was made even more blatant.
By using the verb 'aspergir' to describe the movement of the waves which lap at the Lusitanian coast, Oliveira Martins evokes connotations which suggest a sacred ritual, the making sacred of a destiny which predetermines the future of the earth and its peoples.
25) Apart from these activities, he travelled throughout the length and breadth of Portuguese territory collecting samples of the country's vegetation for an herbarium of Lusitanian flora.
Going back to the definition of 'citizen', the closest the author takes the reader is in Chapter 5, where the first subheading announces 'Privileges for Lusitanian Citizens', but we find instead Muslim and Hindu 'half-citizens'.
28) Both the subtle, ambiguous discourse embodied in Os Lusiadas and the aesthetic elegance used by the poet help deliver the most representative image of the Lusitanian Kingdom.
done a service for the Portuguese themselves, though they will hardly be grateful to him though, as after his small book the Lusitanian myth as a political and historical argument is hardly viable.
The subsequent ruckus really should not occur at all, since, after all, "eternal Fate I (Whose high decrees no Power can ere revoke)" [21] has already decided in favor of the Lusitanians, a decision to which Jupiter, who has the first and last word, has filly acquiesced.