Lyly


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Lyly

John. ?1554--1606, English dramatist and novelist, noted for his two romances, Euphues, or the Anatomy of Wit (1578) and Euphues and his England (1580), written in an elaborate style
References in periodicals archive ?
11) This new set of writers are not described as highly heterogenous, and while Dessen does not spell out the implications of this sentence, such writers are certainly associated by many scholars with generic types, Lyly with comedy and Kyd and Marlowe with tragedy.
Nicholson's Spenser is less wily than her Lyly but similarly indirect.
With a strong international background in both apparel and accessories, Miss Lyly will bring to the business a wealth of experience in the fields of design, development and buying.
Greek for "of good natural parts, graceful, witty," Lyly probably got the term from Roger Ascham's The Scholemaster (1570), an appropriate literary heritage for Ignatius Reilly, whose name evokes the patron saint of education.
Lyly, he suggests, interrogates but cannot quite escape Ascham's certainties.
In doing so, Greene built upon the immense success achieved by Lyly and helped establish a central place for fiction in the steadily rising output of printed books for a variety of readers.
She was also the heroine of a ballad and a play in the 1590s, and was mentioned by writers such as Lyly, Nashe, Harvey, Middleton, and Jonson.
Though the book is a monograph, the words 'The plays of John Lyly.
Linda Lyly is an AFAA certified instructor and freelance writer residing in Columbia, South Carolina.
Maquerlot proposes that the theatrical norm against which Shakespeare's `Mannerist' plays react should be thought of as `rhetorical formalism', the fondness for patterned language and thinking which links the work of Marlowe, Kyd, Lyly and the early Shakespeare.
The legend of Alexander inspired writers down through the ages, from Plutarch (who wrote of him in Parallel Lives) and Ferdowsi (in the Shah-nameh) to John Lyly, Pedro Calderon de la Barca, Jean Racine, Jakob Wassermann, and many others.
The link back to Lyly seals the familiar associations between books and lapdogs, between pleasure-reading and women's leisure and desire.