medlar

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medlar

(mĕd`lər), small deciduous tree (Mespilus germanica) of the family Rosaceae (roserose,
common name for some members of the Rosaceae, a large family of herbs, shrubs, and trees distributed over most of the earth, and for plants of the genus Rosa, the true roses.
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 family), native to Europe and Asia. It has luxuriant foliage and large white or pinkish flowers; in the wild state it is sometimes thorny. The medlar has long been cultivated in parts of Europe for its acid, apple-shaped fruit. It is usually not picked until after it has been touched by frost; then the fruit is stored until the ripening process is completed. It is commonly eaten fresh but is sometimes used for preserves. Medlar is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Rosaceae.

medlar

1. a small Eurasian rosaceous tree, Mespilus germanica
2. the fruit of this tree, which resembles the crab apple and is not edible until it has begun to decay
3. any of several other rosaceous trees or their fruits
References in periodicals archive ?
This early articulation of Lancaster's evaluation viewpoint is revealing of the perspective he brought to bear not only on the MEDLARS evaluation, but throughout his career in other evaluation projects and in his influential books on the subject.
So upon the recommendation of Cleverdon and Herner, NLM Director Cummings engaged Lancaster in December 1965 to evaluate MEDLARS.
As a newcomer previously uninvolved in the design or operation of MEDLARS, he was able to approach the job with a spirit of impartial analysis that was maintained throughout (Lancaster, 1968a).
The Demand Search component of MEDLARS had been in place for nearly two years.
The main objectives were to study the requirements of MEDLARS users, determine the effectiveness and efficiency of MEDLARS in meeting their requirements, identify factors adversely affecting performance, and suggest ways to make improvements.
In an effort to refine and improve MEDLARS services to the biomedical community, the Library has initiated a new project designed to provide data on the usefulness of demand bibliographies.
To achieve a representative sample of users and requests, Lancaster decided on a stratified sample of twenty organizations that had used the MEDLARS service in 1965.
To establish the recall and precision performance figures in the MEDLARS evaluation, Lancaster relied on a formal search request representing the user's actual information needs, followed by the user's assessment as to the relevance of documents to that need.
Lancaster's approach to calculating recall by comparing search results to a set of relevant documents identified completely outside the MEDLARS system was an innovative method for studying recall in an operational setting.
Throughout the MEDLARS analysis, there was a careful distinguishing among the different types of errors, and careful explanations of the distinctions.
Considering the depth of analysis surrounding vocabulary issues in the MEDLARS study, and in the prior studies with the Bureau of Ships and the Cranfield Project, it is not surprising that Lancaster soon became an expert in vocabulary control in information retrieval systems.
The Searching Subsystem was found to be the greatest contributor to MEDLARS failures.