Mie

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Mie

(mē`ā), prefecture (1990 pop. 1,792,542), S Honshu, Japan, on Ise Bay. TsuTsu
, city (1990 pop. 157,177), capital of Mie prefecture, S Honshu, Japan, on Ise Bay. It is a commercial and manufacturing center, with glass, machine, and food-processing factories.
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 (the capital), IseIse
, city (1990 pop. 104,164), Mie prefecture, S Honshu, Japan, on Ise Bay. It is one of the foremost religious centers of Shinto, the site of the shrines of Ise. These three shrines, set deep in a forest, are said to have been built in 4 B.C.
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 (a major Shintoist center), YokkaichiYokkaichi
, city (1990 pop. 274,180), Mie prefecture, W Honshu, Japan, a port on Ise Bay. It is a manufacturing center that produces banko ware (a kind of porcelain), automobiles, cotton textiles, chemicals, tea, cement, and computer parts.
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, Matsusaka, and Kuwana are the chief cities. Mie has traditional industries such as textiles, ceramics, woodworking, and fishing, in addition to modern industries like chemicals, petroleum, iron, and steel. Ise-shima National Park is there.

Mie

 

a prefecture in Japan on central Honshu, mostly on the Kii Peninsula. Area, 5,700 sq km; population, 1,543,000 (1970 census; 60 percent urban). The administrative center is Tsu. In 1970, 14.5 percent of the land was under cultivation, primarily on the Ise coastal plain. Rice is the principal crop (234,000 tons harvested in 1970). Citrus fruits (primarily tangerines), peaches, and persimmons are among the cultivated crops, and there is livestock raising. Forests cover 70 percent of the prefecture. Hunting of marine animals and fishing are important industries. Mie Prefecture ranks first in Japan in pearling (Ago Bay).

In the 1950’s and 1960’s, industry became greatly developed in Mie Prefecture. There are chemical, food, sawmilling, textile, machine-building (shipbuilding, electrical machinery manufac-turing), and petrochemical industries. Cottage industries include the production of cotton fabrics (towels), pottery (kobanyaki), cast metal items, and fishing nets. Industry is concentrated in the northern part of the prefecture, in such cities as Yokkaichi (a large port) and Tsu. There is tourism. The national parks Iseshima and Yoshino-kumano are in Mie Prefecture.

N. A. SMIRNOV