MIMD


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MIMD

[¦em¦ī¦em¦dē]
(computer science)
A type of multiprocessor architecture in which several instruction cycles may be active at any given time, each independently fetching instructions and operands into multiple processing units and operating on them in a concurrent fashion. Acronym for multiple-instruction-stream, multiple-data-stream.

MIMD

MIMD

(Multiple Instruction stream Multiple Data stream) The instruction execution architecture of a CPU that can process two or more independent sets of instructions simultaneously on two or more sets of data. CPUs with multiple cores are examples of MIMD architecture, each core performing SIMD processing. Hyperthreading also results in a certain degree of MIMD performance. See SIMD and hyperthreading.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fast synchronization -- a rich set of synchronization primitives for both MIMD and SIMD programming.
To solve these issues, Renesas Technology has developed a matrix type processor based on a different memory technology from that of a DSP or MIMD type processor.
Furthermore, the new software can support the two dominant styles of massively parallel computing known as SIMD and MIMD.
The new architecture principles are based on a pure MIMD (Multiple Instructions -- Multiple Data) parallel multi-processor architecture combined with asynchronous (or self-clocked/clockless) data-driven operational mode.
Manifold array processor," February 8, 2000 -- "Methods and apparatus for scalable instruction set architecture with dynamic compact instructions," August 8, 2000 -- "Methods and apparatus for efficient synchronous MIMD operations with iVLIW PE-to-PE communication," November 21, 2000 -- "Methods and apparatus for ManArray PE-PE switch control," December 26, 2000 -- "Methods and apparatus for manifold array processing," December 26, 2000 -- "Methods and apparatus for dynamic very long instruction word sub-instruction selection for execution time parallelism in an indirect very long instruction word processor," January 9, 2001
Incorporating both SIMD and MIMD parallelism, the CM-5 is also the first supercomputer architecture that scales to a Teraflop in performance.