MIRV

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MIRV:

see guided missileguided missile,
self-propelled, unmanned space or air vehicle carrying an explosive warhead. Its path can be adjusted during flight, either by automatic self-contained controls or remote human control. Guided missiles are powered either by rocket engines or by jet propulsion.
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MIRV

[mərv]
References in periodicals archive ?
It has also started thinking of building Hypersonic Glide Vehicles in parallel to MIRV technologies.
More importantly, MIRVs are only useful with nuclear weapons.
Schilling, "All You Ever Wanted to Know About MIRV and ICBM Calculations but Were Not Cleared to Ask," The Journal of Conflict Resolution 17, no.
The Soviets had convinced US policy makers across the US ideological divide that fears of a Soviet attack were unwarranted by accepting the double-zero formula and onsite inspections of the 1987 INF Treaty and agreeing to reduce their land-based missiles, trim their MIRV potential, and accept intrusive inspections as formalized in 1991 under the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty.
Yet China's move could propel India to move farther and faster with its arsenal, partly out of fear of China and partly out of fear that its adversary, Pakistan, might obtain the MIRV technology from China, Pakistan's ally.
It said future Chinese ICBMs will probably be equipped with MIRVs, and the number of nuclear warheads capable of reaching the United States could expand to well over 100 in the next 15 years.
Although they may have failed to alter substantive history, nuclear weapons have inspired legions of strategists to spend whole careers agonizing over what one analyst has called "nuclear metaphysics," arguing, for example, over how many MIRVs (multiple independently targetable reentry vehicles) could dance on the head of an ICBM (intercontinental ballistic missile).
Nikolai Novichkov, "Russia to Retain MIRVs Beyond START II Deadline," Jane's Defence Weekly, 29 August 2002.
Lewinter, an MIT professor visiting Japan for a conference, walks into the Soviet embassy and defects, taking with him some of the most crucial and sensitive secrets of the US military, secrets that would enable the Soviets to build an effective anti-missile defense against the MIRVs, the most advanced weapons the US was building.
Instead of MIRVs or ICBMs, we have the new National Missile Defense, which will intercept outside attacks (in theory, of course) instead of deterring them.
It would have eliminated land-based multiple-warhead missiles, or MIRVs, and so-called heavy intercontinental missiles.
Typical examples are the atomic bomb, the MIRVs (multiple independent reentry vehicles), the ABM systems, and a space-stationed "super-laser" gun.