MIRV

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MIRV:

see guided missileguided missile,
self-propelled, unmanned space or air vehicle carrying an explosive warhead. Its path can be adjusted during flight, either by automatic self-contained controls or remote human control. Guided missiles are powered either by rocket engines or by jet propulsion.
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MIRV

[mərv]
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet China's move could propel India to move farther and faster with its arsenal, partly out of fear of China and partly out of fear that its adversary, Pakistan, might obtain the MIRV technology from China, Pakistan's ally.
The focus of an efficient defense should be in the boost phase because the MIRVs, decoys, and chaff are still bundled together, and a single energetic hit will destroy them all.
Lewinter, an MIT professor visiting Japan for a conference, walks into the Soviet embassy and defects, taking with him some of the most crucial and sensitive secrets of the US military, secrets that would enable the Soviets to build an effective anti-missile defense against the MIRVs, the most advanced weapons the US was building.
It would have eliminated land-based multiple-warhead missiles, or MIRVs, and so-called heavy intercontinental missiles.
The Americans missed an opportunity to restrict the deployment of MIRVs in the Nixon Administration.
Myth 1: START II eliminates land-based MIRVs (multiple-warhead missiles).
The Mobile Incident Response Vehicles, or MIRVs, were designed by Cardiff, Wales-based Excelerate Technology - the leading UK information, communications and technology provider for emergency service organizations - and feature wireless infrastructure mesh technology from Los Gatos, Calif.
Richard Mckeand, NHS Hart national project leader, said "This new generation of MIRVs will enable the emergency services to meet their responsibilities under the Civil Contingencies Act, improvemulti agency co-operation and enable major incidents to be resolved more effectively.
The USSR brandished thousands of nuclear warheads and delivery vehicles, MIRVs, submarines, long-range bombers, and a formidable Red Army.
Beijing has attracted useful media attention by threatening to deploy MIRVs if the United States continues to develop its National Missile Defense (NMD) system, and the PRC's leaders may feel that they currently have more to gain by threatening to MIRV than by actually making good on the threat.
Such supercomputers, say experts, are helpful in developing nuclear weapons with MIRVs -- multiple, independently targeted re-entry vehicles -- as well as in information for biological warfare.
experience with multiple, independently targetable reentry vehicles, or MIRVS.